Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

How proud are young people of national history?

25.09.2007
Native youth and those of immigrant background find country of residence important

Despite their various backgrounds, cultures and religions Western European youth think the country in which they live is important. Especially native young people feel a connection with history, and boys more so than girls.

This has emerged from the WRR study Nationale Identiteit en meervoudig verleden (National identity and multiple pasts) from professor Maria Grever and Dr Kees Ribbens of the Erasmus University Rotterdam. Grever and Ribbens asked more than 650 students aged 14 to 18 in Rotterdam, London and Lille to what extent they identify with the country in which they live. What role does national history play in this? The study is published today, Monday 24 September 2007.

Western government leaders talk regularly about the crisis of national identity in their countries. They see the lack of historical knowledge as a driving factor behind this. Dutch young people for instance no longer know who William of Orange is and why Surinamese people have emigrated to the Netherlands. Politicians also think that the integration of newcomers is progressing slowly because it is unclear what “being Dutch” exactly involves. They hope to improve this by introducing a national canon. But is this vision accurate? Is the government not overlooking the enormous diversity of the past and the changeability of social identities?

Grever and Ribbens investigated to what degree Dutch, British and French students aged 14 to 18 identify with their country of residence. They started with the assumption that there is not only one past, but that from generation to generation people pass on all sorts of cultural codes that continue to have an effect for a long time via stories and memories. The researchers looked into what national identity means to the youth. Despite the diversity of backgrounds they all find their country of residence important, though this applies more strongly for native youth than for those of immigrant background. The difference in commitment is also the case with regard to historical interest. Historical connection with the country of residence – like national pride – is primarily alive among native youth. That is not surprising, though native girls have less a feeling of “national pride” than boys.

The differences are greatest when it comes to religion. History of religion scored the highest among many ethnic groups, with the exception of the Surinamese and Antillean youth. Native youth have hardly any identification with this, though Dutch youth did have more interest in it than their English and French peers. Turkish and especially Moroccan youth have a strong cultural identification with Islam. It is conspicuous that although the groups surveyed hardly feel themselves to be European or world citizens, they are interested in European history and world history especially.

The WRR study Nationale Identiteit en meervoudig verleden will appear on Monday 24 September 2007. It supports the WRR report Identificatie met Nederland (Identification with the Netherlands) that professor Pauline Meurs will present to Justice Minister Hirsch Ballin, in the presence of Princess Maxima, on behalf of the Scientific Council for Government Policy (WRR) on the same day.

Yvette Nelen | alfa
Further information:
http://www.eur.nl/english

More articles from Social Sciences:

nachricht Sibling differences: Later-borns choose less prestigious programs at university
14.11.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für demografische Forschung

nachricht Visual intelligence is not the same as IQ
09.11.2017 | Vanderbilt University

All articles from Social Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Artificial agent designs quantum experiments

On the way to an intelligent laboratory, physicists from Innsbruck and Vienna present an artificial agent that autonomously designs quantum experiments. In initial experiments, the system has independently (re)discovered experimental techniques that are nowadays standard in modern quantum optical laboratories. This shows how machines could play a more creative role in research in the future.

We carry smartphones in our pockets, the streets are dotted with semi-autonomous cars, but in the research laboratory experiments are still being designed by...

Im Focus: Scientists decipher key principle behind reaction of metalloenzymes

So-called pre-distorted states accelerate photochemical reactions too

What enables electrons to be transferred swiftly, for example during photosynthesis? An interdisciplinary team of researchers has worked out the details of how...

Im Focus: The first precise measurement of a single molecule's effective charge

For the first time, scientists have precisely measured the effective electrical charge of a single molecule in solution. This fundamental insight of an SNSF Professor could also pave the way for future medical diagnostics.

Electrical charge is one of the key properties that allows molecules to interact. Life itself depends on this phenomenon: many biological processes involve...

Im Focus: Paradigm shift in Paris: Encouraging an holistic view of laser machining

At the JEC World Composite Show in Paris in March 2018, the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT will be focusing on the latest trends and innovations in laser machining of composites. Among other things, researchers at the booth shared with the Aachen Center for Integrative Lightweight Production (AZL) will demonstrate how lasers can be used for joining, structuring, cutting and drilling composite materials.

No other industry has attracted as much public attention to composite materials as the automotive industry, which along with the aerospace industry is a driver...

Im Focus: Room-temperature multiferroic thin films and their properties

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and Tohoku University have developed high-quality GFO epitaxial films and systematically investigated their ferroelectric and ferromagnetic properties. They also demonstrated the room-temperature magnetocapacitance effects of these GFO thin films.

Multiferroic materials show magnetically driven ferroelectricity. They are attracting increasing attention because of their fascinating properties such as...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

10th International Symposium: “Advanced Battery Power – Kraftwerk Batterie” Münster, 10-11 April 2018

08.01.2018 | Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Let the good tubes roll

19.01.2018 | Materials Sciences

How cancer metastasis happens: Researchers reveal a key mechanism

19.01.2018 | Health and Medicine

Meteoritic stardust unlocks timing of supernova dust formation

19.01.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>