Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Female Discrimination In Science

07.03.2002


Since the 30s of the 20th century, after two wars and revolutions, a lot of women have been joining scientific activities. At last, after centuries of fighting for their rights, women became considered full members of society. Women were welcome to work if they wished to - but only on equal terms with men. However, men and women were not to equalize in rights in terms of housekeeping obligations. It so happened that women did housekeeping, brought up children, and worked as hard as men. Initially, in the heat of excitement women did not notice the crying injustice, now that a century has passed, and it is high time to calmly review the global experiment.

According to Svetlana Sycheva, specialist of the Institute of Geography, there is a direct evidence of female discrimination in our society, this can be distinctly traced in science, especially in the community of researchers involved in the soil science. Probably, it is due to the fact that biology is closely related with the soil science, there are particularly many women involved in it, but their achievements have failed obtain so high estimate as those of men. For example, in various years there occurred more than a dozen Academicians and Corresponding Members among the soil scientists - they were all men. As a rule, the females do not occupy the executive positions: director, dean, rector (head of a university). The highest position they can be assigned to is the head of a chair, laboratory, or department. The fair sex is also being deprived of the government awards. Women are rare among administrators, members of scientific magazines` editorial board and of academic councils. They are less represented at large scientific conferences and international meetings. However, in the soil science the position of women is much better than in other more `masculine` sciences. "Often, the females` accomplishments in science are recognized only when the women are of advanced age or when these accomplishments are so evident that it is inconvenient to conceal them", says Sycheva.

Detraction of women starts after the graduation from the institute - as a rule, the females are assigned to less paid positions as compared to men. However, the females achieve much better results when studying: among the persons interrogated by Sycheva, 40% of women and 16% of men have the honours degree. But on the other hand, there are twice as much male students getting the C grade than female ones. Women spent more time on writing the thesis (5 years on the Ph.D. thesis and 20 years on the doctoral thesis, men spending respectively 3 and 10 years). It tends to be difficult for a woman to publish her scientific article in the leading magazines, the deadline for the thesis presenting being often delayed on purpose.



According to Sycheva`s data, 54% of women and only 10% of men spend on housekeeping from 1 to 3 hours a day. But these are good results, since 27% of men do not spend a single hour per day on housekeeping. This proves that Russian women fulfil the second (domestic) job which is not accounted or paid for by the government. All these factors taken together result in lost opportunities to make a carrier and, consequently, low salary. Regrettable as it may be, but it should be acknowledged that real equality of sexes does not exist in terms of job positions and salary. Apparently women have fewer opportunities than men to promote their carreer.

Female persistence can only be envied, at all costs women aim at raising their professional level, i.e. obtaining academic degree. Among Ph.Ds females are not fewer than males, there are a lot of Professors among women as well. Women have managed to achieve all this despite the fact that only 53% of them can study at home (for instance, read scientific literature), while the respective figure for men makes 73%. Women write from 3 to 5 scientific articles per year, nevertheless the share of `feminine articles` does not exceed 16% of the total number of published articles. As regards to the question whether the carrier is successful, the positive reply was given by 50% of women, i.e. as many as men.

Tatiana Pitchugina | alphagalileo

More articles from Social Sciences:

nachricht Amazingly flexible: Learning to read in your thirties profoundly transforms the brain
26.05.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Kognitions- und Neurowissenschaften

nachricht Fixating on faces
26.01.2017 | California Institute of Technology

All articles from Social Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Fizzy soda water could be key to clean manufacture of flat wonder material: Graphene

Whether you call it effervescent, fizzy, or sparkling, carbonated water is making a comeback as a beverage. Aside from quenching thirst, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have discovered a new use for these "bubbly" concoctions that will have major impact on the manufacturer of the world's thinnest, flattest, and one most useful materials -- graphene.

As graphene's popularity grows as an advanced "wonder" material, the speed and quality at which it can be manufactured will be paramount. With that in mind,...

Im Focus: Exotic quantum states made from light: Physicists create optical “wells” for a super-photon

Physicists at the University of Bonn have managed to create optical hollows and more complex patterns into which the light of a Bose-Einstein condensate flows. The creation of such highly low-loss structures for light is a prerequisite for complex light circuits, such as for quantum information processing for a new generation of computers. The researchers are now presenting their results in the journal Nature Photonics.

Light particles (photons) occur as tiny, indivisible portions. Many thousands of these light portions can be merged to form a single super-photon if they are...

Im Focus: Circular RNA linked to brain function

For the first time, scientists have shown that circular RNA is linked to brain function. When a RNA molecule called Cdr1as was deleted from the genome of mice, the animals had problems filtering out unnecessary information – like patients suffering from neuropsychiatric disorders.

While hundreds of circular RNAs (circRNAs) are abundant in mammalian brains, one big question has remained unanswered: What are they actually good for? In the...

Im Focus: RAVAN CubeSat measures Earth's outgoing energy

An experimental small satellite has successfully collected and delivered data on a key measurement for predicting changes in Earth's climate.

The Radiometer Assessment using Vertically Aligned Nanotubes (RAVAN) CubeSat was launched into low-Earth orbit on Nov. 11, 2016, in order to test new...

Im Focus: Scientists shine new light on the “other high temperature superconductor”

A study led by scientists of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg presents evidence of the coexistence of superconductivity and “charge-density-waves” in compounds of the poorly-studied family of bismuthates. This observation opens up new perspectives for a deeper understanding of the phenomenon of high-temperature superconductivity, a topic which is at the core of condensed matter research since more than 30 years. The paper by Nicoletti et al has been published in the PNAS.

Since the beginning of the 20th century, superconductivity had been observed in some metals at temperatures only a few degrees above the absolute zero (minus...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Call for Papers – ICNFT 2018, 5th International Conference on New Forming Technology

16.08.2017 | Event News

Sustainability is the business model of tomorrow

04.08.2017 | Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

A Map of the Cell’s Power Station

18.08.2017 | Life Sciences

Engineering team images tiny quasicrystals as they form

18.08.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Researchers printed graphene-like materials with inkjet

18.08.2017 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>