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Peace Laureate and pupils ‘jam’ for non-violence

02.03.2007
150 teenagers from disadvantaged areas across the UK will come together in Bradford this weekend to learn non-violent solutions to conflict in their lives from Nobel Peace Prize winner Jody Williams.

The University of Bradford will host Britain's second annual 'PeaceJam' event on 3 and 4 March 2007. To open the event, Jody Williams, who won the 1997 Nobel Peace Prize in recognition of her leadership in the campaign to ban landmines, will give a public lecture at the University on Friday 2 March at 5pm. Outspoken and inspirational, Jody will talk on the theme: 'Individuals can make a difference in a world in conflict'.

PeaceJam is an international education programme which started in the USA over 10 years ago and now operates in nine other countries worldwide. However, Bradford is the only British city to host this unique event.

Over 150 school pupils from across the UK will descend on the University of Bradford on Saturday 3 and Sunday 4 March to participate in games, team building exercises and inspirational workshops as well as the more serious talks and the setting up of community projects, which make up the PeaceJam.

Dr Fiona MacAulay, from the University of Bradford’s Department of Peace Studies, said: ”We are delighted to host the UK’s only PeaceJam event and we’re proud to welcome Nobel Laureate Jody Williams to Bradford.

“She serves as an inspiration to peacemakers around the world, none more so than the teens who will learn from her as they participate in the weekend’s PeaceJam event.”

Tony Myers from PeaceJam UK said: “We give schools and kids a fantastic opportunity to learn how to deal with problems and conflict in a non-violent manner.

“The Nobel Laureates help to create the curriculum and work personally with the youngsters, passing on their skills and wisdom as well as explaining what inspires them to continue their work. The students also set up and work on a project that will improve their own neighbourhood so the objectives include solving local as well as global issues.”

Emma Banks | alfa
Further information:
http://www.peacejam.org
http://www.bradford.ac.uk

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