Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Ageing and Pensions – ESRC Offers New Dynamics for Old

07.12.2005


By 2025 the number of people in Britain over the age of 60 will outnumber those under 25. Pressure on both pensions and pensioner spending power will increase. Answers to problems, old and new, will have to be sought.



In a move to address the issues of ageing - one of the most significant aspects of change in our lives, the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) is highlighting the impact of ageing on society, and offering expanded research funding to provide leading edge thinking in this highly relevant area.

Professor Ian Diamond Chief Executive of the ESRC says: "As a key part of our Strategic Plan, over the next two years ESRC will spend over £2.5 million funding ageing research - in addition to our continuing responsive-mode research portfolio worth a further £2 million. We are confident that Britain’s leading social-scientists will target such resources for innovative research into the challenges of ageing and play a major part in understanding the changes to society that will affect all our lives."


ESRC funded research has featured through the Institute for Fiscal Studies(IFS), which hosts the Centre for Microeconomic Analysis of Public Policy directed by Professor Richard Blundell of University College London alongside Professor James Banks, Director of the Centre for Economic Research on Ageing at the IFS. "Prepared for Retirement?" - new work from the IFS on the adequacy and distribution of retirement resources, has researched future wealth patterns amongst the retired, and provisions that they may make.

The report highlights that government and private pensions needs are changing, and that for the first time, retirees face less pensions provisions than their predecessors; changes to working patterns will affect the balance of labour supply and labour demand amongst both young and old.

As the lifecourse of the elderly changes as they work longer, contribute more to the economy, and have a wider role in the family amid increasing life expectancy, the dynamics of ageing are changing as never before.

In a move to tackle such challenges, the ESRC’s ageing related research includes a major interdisciplinary research programme - the New Dynamics of Ageing (NDA).

This initiative will provide a strong evidence base for policy decisions and fund exploration into the major issues of ageing. Headed by Professor Alan Walker, University of Sheffield, (who previously led ESRC’s Growing Older Programme), the NDA work is planned to run for over five years at a budget of over £12 million pounds, and will involve a wide variety of scientists across many disciplines. It is jointly funded by the Economic and Social Research Council, Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council and the Medical Research Council.

The NDA programme addresses research questions that are relevant to not just existing pensioners, but also those post-war baby boomers who are now aged 40-65 - people who have very different retirement expectations.

Other ESRC research funding into ageing, includes major research programmes, individual research grants, and studentships.

The ESRC funded programme, Simulating Social Policy for an Ageing Society has identified women as one of the most vulnerable pension groups. This authoritative study from the London School of Economics and Southampton University led by Professor Jane Falkingham, provides diverse evidence in order to examine a range of social policy reform scenarios.

The changing health implications of ageing are focused upon by ESRC’s Innovative Health Technologies programme. Jointly funded by the Medical Research Council, this major research programme directed by Professor Andrew Webster at the University of York, examines the role in which new technologies can play in redefining how we manage health and medicine. Through this programme, for example, Professor Jane Seymour at Nottingham University has spotlighted aspects of care provision in old age.

The ageing debate is also discussed in ESRC’s current publication The Edge and at ESRC’s online resource, www.esrcsocietytoday.ac.uk - ’Our Ageing Society’ where reviews of the public debates the ESRC is hosting - one each in England, Scotland, and Wales up to December 6th are featured. ESRC’s Teaching and Learning Research Programme directed by Professor Andrew Pollard at the Institute of Education also supports learning developments for older people - through three targeted research projects.

ESRC’s Ian Diamond is clear about the Council’s commitment: "We at the ESRC are committed to providing the best social science research on ageing, and strongly believe that the research programmes we support, such as the New Dynamics of Ageing, can provide a foundation for future policy."

William Godwin | alfa
Further information:
http://www.esrc.ac.uk

More articles from Social Sciences:

nachricht Fixating on faces
26.01.2017 | California Institute of Technology

nachricht Internet use in class tied to lower test scores
16.12.2016 | Michigan State University

All articles from Social Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

New risk factors for anxiety disorders

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

MWC 2017: 5G Capital Berlin

24.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>