Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

One in five say business hit by yob culture

27.10.2005


One in five people who responded to an internet survey run by The University of Nottingham Institute for Enterprise and Innovation said that ‘yob culture’ has had a significant impact on their business.



Just over one-fifth of respondents to The UK Business Barometer said the growth of yob culture, as reported in the media, was reflected in their own experiences and affected their business highly or quite highly.

Just over one-third of the respondents (35 per cent) said that yob culture did not have any affect at all on their ability to trade.


Businesses are frequently targeted by criminals but there can be disincentives to reporting crimes, for example, the time taken to do so and the costs of future insurance premia. In the September survey, almost one-third (29 per cent) admitted they had decided against calling the police.

The recent survey also quizzed businesses on whether the mood of the nation following major sporting success translates into the workplace. The recent England success in the Ashes cricket series sparked much discussion and celebration around the country and 49 per cent of respondents felt that national sporting success makes for a more enthusiastic and positive attitude to work. In contrast, 28 per cent thought it made no difference at all.

The survey also turned the spotlight on graduates in business. The National Council for Graduate Entrepreneurship was formed in 2004 to promote entrepreneurship as a career option to graduates. Entrepreneurship has been a growth area particularly since the launch in 2000 of the Science Enterprise Challenge Initiative, and pioneering courses are helping to bring out the innovation dimension, for example, through the development of creative problem solving skills.

Small businesses were asked for their perceptions of whether recent graduates make promising entrepreneurs and the same question was posed to business advisers in the UKBB’s sister survey, the UK Business Adviser Barometer (UKBAB). There was broad agreement between the two communities. Fifty-one per cent from UKBB and 46 per cent of UKBAB thought they were average, while 12 per cent of UKBB respondents felt they would make promising entrepreneurs. Thirty-seven per cent believed they would be unpromising or very unpromising.

The September survey also posed questions on externally provided business advice, evaluating strategic matters, collateral and A-levels as an indicator of success.

The UK Business Barometer (UKBB) and UK Business Adviser Barometer (UKBAB) operate over the web to generate very rapid results. The surveys have unique software that enables results to be processed and posted on their respective websites immediately they arrive.

The survey results are published monthly and more information, including a press pack, can be found on the web at www.ukbb.ac and www.ukbab.ac Businesses and advisers wishing to contribute as panellists on the project should visit the appropriate Business Barometer website to register.

Rick Eagles | alfa
Further information:
http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/public-affairs/press-releases/index.phtml?menu=pressreleases&code=ONE-157/05&create_date=26-oct-2005

More articles from Social Sciences:

nachricht Fixating on faces
26.01.2017 | California Institute of Technology

nachricht Internet use in class tied to lower test scores
16.12.2016 | Michigan State University

All articles from Social Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

New risk factors for anxiety disorders

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

MWC 2017: 5G Capital Berlin

24.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>