Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Empirical Study: Careers Take an Unexpected Course

25.04.2005


Careers are influenced by manifold factors - and in other ways than we think. This has been demonstrated by a study now-published by the Vienna University of Economics and Business Administration. The extensive project traced numerous job histories over an extended time period and analysed critical influencing factors. The project funded by the Austrian Science Fund (FWF) thereby questions some popular beliefs. The most important results will now be published as a book.

A team headed by Prof. Wolfgang Mayrhofer of the Vienna University of Economics and Business Administration has now successfully concluded the first phase of the study on the development of careers (Vienna Career Panel Project, ViCaPP), a unique venture in the German-speaking region. During this extensive study, the career developments of more than 1,000 university graduates in the area of business administration were analysed. The fact that the results are already published in a book which is a pleasant contrast to many pseudo-scientific career guides, is mainly due to some very astonishing results.

Getting Ahead in Winding Ways



The study fundamentally challenges prior views on "getting ahead". Particularly remarkable are four results of the study.

First - new career areas have become increasingly popular. Today, nearly one third of the graduates, indeed the better ones, do not aspire for traditional corporate careers. They rather prefer a "chronically flexible" career course that is characterised by versatile activities.

Second - when entering a professional career, neither good final grades nor completing the studies in minimum time provide any advantage. It is practical experience that counts. However, this picture changes during the first decade of the career. Prof. Mayrhofer explains, "After ten years in the profession, people with good grades and a high pace during their studies will earn more."

Third - personality is less important than previously assumed. Only leadership motivation has an important influence on successful careers. Other factors such as need for achievement, flexibility and emotional stability have very little effect on the success of a career.

Fourth - the project "Me" as advertising firm. Even though there is only a weak overall link between career tactics and successful careers, self-promotion can be particularly successful. Project co-director Prof. Steyrer says, "Whilst it was previously recommendable to act with restraint, today one benefits by emphasising one’s abilities and ideas. Playing to the galleries is more profitable than to work on relationships."

Gender Matters
Prof. Mayrhofer and his team offer further interesting results on the influence of the gender on the development of careers. The study provides some empirical evidence, hitherto missing, that the influence of gender on salary and managerial responsibility is higher than the influence of personality.

Project co-director Prof. Michael Meyer explains, "In the course of ten years, women earn over 71,000 euro less than men even when the only difference is their gender and they have the same uninterrupted course of career. The discrimination of women is thus blatantly obvious. Career interruptions of males have a stronger impact on income and status, however at a higher level."

A gender-specific link between the educational levels of parents and careers can be also found. Sons of parents with higher education receive clearly more salary later on; daughters on the other hand are significantly more discontent. As the study shows, especially daughters of successful parents experience frustration with gender-specific obstacles to their careers.

The results of the project funded by the FWF demonstrate the immediate benefit of basic research for everyday life. The insight into career trajectories informs managements and educational institutions on careers of graduates. Likewise, it offers orientation for job applicants. The book entitled "Macht? Erfolg? Reich? Glücklich? Einflussfaktoren auf die Karrieren" (Power? Success? Wealth? Happiness? Factors influencing careers) edited by Prof. Mayrhofer and his colleagues, Prof. Meyer and Prof. Steyrer, offers a comprehensible guideline in these areas.

Till C. Jelitto | alfa
Further information:
http://www.vicapp.at

More articles from Social Sciences:

nachricht Illinois researchers researchers find tweeting in cities lower than expected
21.02.2018 | University of Illinois College of Engineering

nachricht Polluted air may pollute our morality
08.02.2018 | Association for Psychological Science

All articles from Social Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Spider silk key to new bone-fixing composite

University of Connecticut researchers have created a biodegradable composite made of silk fibers that can be used to repair broken load-bearing bones without the complications sometimes presented by other materials.

Repairing major load-bearing bones such as those in the leg can be a long and uncomfortable process.

Im Focus: Writing and deleting magnets with lasers

Study published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces is the outcome of an international effort that included teams from Dresden and Berlin in Germany, and the US.

Scientists at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) together with colleagues from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) and the University of Virginia...

Im Focus: Gamma-ray flashes from plasma filaments

Novel highly efficient and brilliant gamma-ray source: Based on model calculations, physicists of the Max PIanck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg propose a novel method for an efficient high-brilliance gamma-ray source. A giant collimated gamma-ray pulse is generated from the interaction of a dense ultra-relativistic electron beam with a thin solid conductor. Energetic gamma-rays are copiously produced as the electron beam splits into filaments while propagating across the conductor. The resulting gamma-ray energy and flux enable novel experiments in nuclear and fundamental physics.

The typical wavelength of light interacting with an object of the microcosm scales with the size of this object. For atoms, this ranges from visible light to...

Im Focus: Basel researchers succeed in cultivating cartilage from stem cells

Stable joint cartilage can be produced from adult stem cells originating from bone marrow. This is made possible by inducing specific molecular processes occurring during embryonic cartilage formation, as researchers from the University and University Hospital of Basel report in the scientific journal PNAS.

Certain mesenchymal stem/stromal cells from the bone marrow of adults are considered extremely promising for skeletal tissue regeneration. These adult stem...

Im Focus: Like a wedge in a hinge

Researchers lay groundwork to tailor drugs for new targets in cancer therapy

In the fight against cancer, scientists are developing new drugs to hit tumor cells at so far unused weak points. Such a “sore spot” is the protein complex...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Invitation to the upcoming "Current Topics in Bioinformatics: Big Data in Genomics and Medicine"

13.04.2018 | Event News

Unique scope of UV LED technologies and applications presented in Berlin: ICULTA-2018

12.04.2018 | Event News

IWOLIA: A conference bringing together German Industrie 4.0 and French Industrie du Futur

09.04.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Magnetic nano-imaging on a table top

20.04.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Start of work for the world's largest electric truck

20.04.2018 | Interdisciplinary Research

Atoms may hum a tune from grand cosmic symphony

20.04.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>