Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New study seeks understanding of effects of social phobia

25.01.2005


Social phobia or social anxiety disorder is a common and distressing problem that can cause sufferers immense difficulties in all areas of their lives, affecting their performance at work and personal relationships.



Now, a team of researchers at the University of Southampton is about to embark on a study which aims to develop a better understanding of how emotions such as social phobia affect sufferers’ thinking and attention. Their findings could help to develop strategies in the future to treat people who experience high levels of anxiety in social situations.

Social phobia is much more severe than just shyness. It is characterised by a marked fear or dread of social situations and of behaving in an embarrassing way whilst talking or meeting with other people, especially strangers. Up to one in ten people experience some degree of social phobia and almost twice as many women are affected than men.


The research team is currently looking to recruit volunteers in the Southampton area to take part in the study. Volunteers should be aged between 18 and 65 years and regularly experience high levels of personal distress in social or performance situations. They may also avoid these kinds of situations altogether in order to avoid becoming distressed.

The study will involve a short interview during which participants will be asked about their experiences. They will then have to complete a short series of computer-based tasks and a number of questionnaires. Where appropriate, there will be an opportunity to discuss possible treatment options with members of the research team.
Dr David Baldwin, a Senior Lecturer in Psychiatry in the University’s School of Medicine who is one of the leaders of the research team, says: ‘This new study builds on our earlier work in this area. We aim to develop a better understanding of the relationships between emotions, thinking and attention to different types of information. We hope the findings will prove useful in devising new treatment approaches for this common and very upsetting medical condition.’

The research is being carried out in collaboration between researchers in the Schools of Psychology and Medicine and doctors in the Mood Disorders Service at the Royal South Hants Hospital in Southampton.

Sarah Watts | alfa
Further information:
http://www.soton.ac.uk

More articles from Social Sciences:

nachricht Fixating on faces
26.01.2017 | California Institute of Technology

nachricht Internet use in class tied to lower test scores
16.12.2016 | Michigan State University

All articles from Social Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Microhotplates for a smart gas sensor

22.02.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Scientists unlock ability to generate new sensory hair cells

22.02.2017 | Life Sciences

Prediction: More gas-giants will be found orbiting Sun-like stars

22.02.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>