Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Happy home and social life makes living in a poor neighbourhood more bearable for adolescents

12.01.2005


Individual and family attributes may make some adolescents more ‘resilient’ to the effects of living in a disadvantaged community, according to new research sponsored by the ESRC.



How inner city young people feel about their own psychological and social health and the area where they live is influenced by differences in home and social life as well as the physical environment, says a study led by Professor Sarah Curtis, of Queen Mary, University of London.

Research based on The RELACHS survey among 2,790 adolescents in 28 schools in East London, found also that other young people may have characteristics making them more susceptible to the impact of area deprivation (see Notes for Editors). Data from the survey was linked to details about the neighbourhoods where the youngsters were living, enabling researchers to gather individual information about each young person and their family.


Professor Curtis said: “Overall, individual adolescents seemed to be sensitive to conditions in the areas where they lived. They were more likely to have negative perceptions of the neighbourhood if their homes were in more disadvantaged areas. “We also found that the young people’s dissatisfaction with their neighbourhood, and negative perceptions of local amenities, were quite strongly and positively associated with psychological distress. “However, we cannot ascertain whether this was because poor perception of the neighbourhood contributed to their psychological distress, or that distressed children were more likely to view their neighbourhood negatively.”

From the survey, researchers examined information including adolescents’ own views of their psychological and social health, their perception of local amenities, general satisfaction or otherwise with their neighbourhood, their ethnic group and whether they had a long-term illness or special educational needs. The survey also showed whether the young people lived with both natural parents, a lone parent, or a parent co-habiting with a new partner, and if in the family there was discord or harmony, unemployment, money problems or social support.

Those from areas with higher deprivation in education, income and employment had a generally poorer perception of local amenities, whereas those from areas near to parks or major roads were more positive in their views. Children from areas of educational deprivation also tended to express greater dissatisfaction with their environment. Whilst there was some evidence that those who lived in more deprived areas had poorer health, this was not significant in statistical terms, says the study. Far more evident were the strong associations between mental health and individuals’ home and social situations.

On average, mental distress was worse for girls than boys and for children with long term illness, special educational needs and reconstituted families.
Mental health was better for those whose families offered strong social support, had no financial worries and harmonious relationships.

Dissatisfaction with the neighbourhood was also greater among girls than boys and older adolescents. Those who were of Asian or Black origin, and from relatively harmonious families with higher levels of social support, were less likely to be unhappy about the area in which they lived.

Backgrounds of unemployment, and low level of skills and educational attainment, had a much smaller effect on attitudes.

Becky Gammon | alfa
Further information:
http://www.esrc.ac.uk

More articles from Social Sciences:

nachricht Fixating on faces
26.01.2017 | California Institute of Technology

nachricht Internet use in class tied to lower test scores
16.12.2016 | Michigan State University

All articles from Social Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A quantum walk of photons

Physicists from the University of Würzburg are capable of generating identical looking single light particles at the push of a button. Two new studies now demonstrate the potential this method holds.

The quantum computer has fuelled the imagination of scientists for decades: It is based on fundamentally different phenomena than a conventional computer....

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

Im Focus: Using graphene to create quantum bits

In the race to produce a quantum computer, a number of projects are seeking a way to create quantum bits -- or qubits -- that are stable, meaning they are not much affected by changes in their environment. This normally needs highly nonlinear non-dissipative elements capable of functioning at very low temperatures.

In pursuit of this goal, researchers at EPFL's Laboratory of Photonics and Quantum Measurements LPQM (STI/SB), have investigated a nonlinear graphene-based...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Physicists discover mechanism behind granular capillary effect

24.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Measured for the first time: Direction of light waves changed by quantum effect

24.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>