Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New Research Finds Boys Have More Literacy Problems than Girls

14.05.2004


New research from the University of Warwick finds that boys really do have more reading difficulties than girls. The study into reading disabilities, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, confirms that boys are much more prone to having trouble than girls, and it’s not simply because they’re more disruptive.



About 15 percent of school-aged children have a learning disability, and the findings suggest boys are at least twice as likely to have dyslexia, a learning disability that involves trouble with reading.

Reading difficulties can also be due to poor vision, hearing problems, emotional problems and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).


The research examined four previous large-scale studies of reading in children. The studies included 9,799 children 7 to 15 years of age, and in each study, around 50 percent of the children were boys.

A team of researchers found there are significant gender differences in reading. In each study boys were notably more likely to have dyslexia than girls. Across all the studies, about 20 percent of the boys had reading disabilities compared with about 11 percent of the girls.

The research implies that reading disabilities are genetic. Boys are more likely to have a range of developmental difficulties, and dyslexia is one of them.

The research also has wider implications for educationalists. The earlier learning difficulties are identified the better schools and parents will be at providing early treatment for those affected. The study suggests that educational programmes should address boys’ early emerging disability.

The results are strong because the studies did not rely on children who were already known to be having learning difficulties - a weakness of some previous research.

Previous research has suggested the reason that reading disabilities are more common among boys is that teachers simply tend to recognise the problem in boys more often. It is sometimes thought that boys are more disruptive, so the teachers pay more attention to them. However, the new study found gender differences in a representative sample of children, suggesting that the numbers of those identified as having problems are accurate.

Dr Julia Carroll, a lecturer in psychology at the University of Warwick, said: “There has been an ongoing debate after some studies found that reading problems were equal for boys and girls, but this thorough large-scale study with should put that controversy to rest.”

Dr Carroll, added: “Clearly, there is a higher percentage of reading-disabled males, which is consistent with most earlier studies. As reading disability in childhood is associated with adjustment problems in later life, there is a definite need to recognise sex differences.”

For more information contact: Dr Julia Carroll, Psychology Department, University of Warwick, Tel: 024765 23613, Email: J.M.Carroll@warwick.ac.ukor Jenny Murray, Communications Office, University of Warwick, Tel: 02476 574 255, Mobile: 07876217740

Jenny Murray | University of Warwick
Further information:
http://www.newsandevents.warwick.ac.uk/index.cfm?page=pressrelease&id=1885

More articles from Social Sciences:

nachricht Internet use in class tied to lower test scores
16.12.2016 | Michigan State University

nachricht Geographers provide new insight into commuter megaregions of the US
01.12.2016 | Dartmouth College

All articles from Social Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Quantum optical sensor for the first time tested in space – with a laser system from Berlin

For the first time ever, a cloud of ultra-cold atoms has been successfully created in space on board of a sounding rocket. The MAIUS mission demonstrates that quantum optical sensors can be operated even in harsh environments like space – a prerequi-site for finding answers to the most challenging questions of fundamental physics and an important innovation driver for everyday applications.

According to Albert Einstein's Equivalence Principle, all bodies are accelerated at the same rate by the Earth's gravity, regardless of their properties. This...

Im Focus: Traffic jam in empty space

New success for Konstanz physicists in studying the quantum vacuum

An important step towards a completely new experimental access to quantum physics has been made at University of Konstanz. The team of scientists headed by...

Im Focus: How gut bacteria can make us ill

HZI researchers decipher infection mechanisms of Yersinia and immune responses of the host

Yersiniae cause severe intestinal infections. Studies using Yersinia pseudotuberculosis as a model organism aim to elucidate the infection mechanisms of these...

Im Focus: Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

Researchers from the University of Hamburg in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, have synthesized a new superconducting material by growing a few layers of an antiferromagnetic transition-metal chalcogenide on a bismuth-based topological insulator, both being non-superconducting materials.

While superconductivity and magnetism are generally believed to be mutually exclusive, surprisingly, in this new material, superconducting correlations...

Im Focus: Studying fundamental particles in materials

Laser-driving of semimetals allows creating novel quasiparticle states within condensed matter systems and switching between different states on ultrafast time scales

Studying properties of fundamental particles in condensed matter systems is a promising approach to quantum field theory. Quasiparticles offer the opportunity...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Sustainable Water use in Agriculture in Eastern Europe and Central Asia

19.01.2017 | Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

New technology for mass-production of complex molded composite components

23.01.2017 | Process Engineering

Quantum optical sensor for the first time tested in space – with a laser system from Berlin

23.01.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

The interactome of infected neural cells reveals new therapeutic targets for Zika

23.01.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>