Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New Research Finds Boys Have More Literacy Problems than Girls

14.05.2004


New research from the University of Warwick finds that boys really do have more reading difficulties than girls. The study into reading disabilities, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, confirms that boys are much more prone to having trouble than girls, and it’s not simply because they’re more disruptive.



About 15 percent of school-aged children have a learning disability, and the findings suggest boys are at least twice as likely to have dyslexia, a learning disability that involves trouble with reading.

Reading difficulties can also be due to poor vision, hearing problems, emotional problems and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).


The research examined four previous large-scale studies of reading in children. The studies included 9,799 children 7 to 15 years of age, and in each study, around 50 percent of the children were boys.

A team of researchers found there are significant gender differences in reading. In each study boys were notably more likely to have dyslexia than girls. Across all the studies, about 20 percent of the boys had reading disabilities compared with about 11 percent of the girls.

The research implies that reading disabilities are genetic. Boys are more likely to have a range of developmental difficulties, and dyslexia is one of them.

The research also has wider implications for educationalists. The earlier learning difficulties are identified the better schools and parents will be at providing early treatment for those affected. The study suggests that educational programmes should address boys’ early emerging disability.

The results are strong because the studies did not rely on children who were already known to be having learning difficulties - a weakness of some previous research.

Previous research has suggested the reason that reading disabilities are more common among boys is that teachers simply tend to recognise the problem in boys more often. It is sometimes thought that boys are more disruptive, so the teachers pay more attention to them. However, the new study found gender differences in a representative sample of children, suggesting that the numbers of those identified as having problems are accurate.

Dr Julia Carroll, a lecturer in psychology at the University of Warwick, said: “There has been an ongoing debate after some studies found that reading problems were equal for boys and girls, but this thorough large-scale study with should put that controversy to rest.”

Dr Carroll, added: “Clearly, there is a higher percentage of reading-disabled males, which is consistent with most earlier studies. As reading disability in childhood is associated with adjustment problems in later life, there is a definite need to recognise sex differences.”

For more information contact: Dr Julia Carroll, Psychology Department, University of Warwick, Tel: 024765 23613, Email: J.M.Carroll@warwick.ac.ukor Jenny Murray, Communications Office, University of Warwick, Tel: 02476 574 255, Mobile: 07876217740

Jenny Murray | University of Warwick
Further information:
http://www.newsandevents.warwick.ac.uk/index.cfm?page=pressrelease&id=1885

More articles from Social Sciences:

nachricht Fixating on faces
26.01.2017 | California Institute of Technology

nachricht Internet use in class tied to lower test scores
16.12.2016 | Michigan State University

All articles from Social Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Safe glide at total engine failure with ELA-inside

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded after a glide flight with an Airbus A320 in ditching on the Hudson River. All 155 people on board were saved.

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded...

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

New pop-up strategy inspired by cuts, not folds

27.02.2017 | Materials Sciences

Sandia uses confined nanoparticles to improve hydrogen storage materials performance

27.02.2017 | Interdisciplinary Research

Decoding the genome's cryptic language

27.02.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>