Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


Educational experts call for action to stem ’islamophobia’


Educational experts have challenged the Government to provide specialist teachers in Citizenship in order to stem the growing tide of Islamophobia post 9/11.

University of Leicester staff and students have highlighted the need for changes in the curriculum in order to promote an inclusive national identity. Their views are expressed in the latest edition of the journal ’Race Equality Teaching’.

Professor Audrey Osler, Director of the Centre for Citizenship Studies in Education at the University of Leicester, said citizenship education can transform the curriculum.

Her views are echoed by University of Leicester graduate Kirsty James, a former PGCE Citizenship student (2002-03) and a teacher at a City of Leicester School. She suggests how teachers can promote an inclusive national identity. She challenges the Government to provide more specialist teachers of Citizenship.

She writes: "The events of 11 September 2001 have profoundly changed British society. There is increased racism and a worrying rise in Islamophobia. Citizenship education is about overcoming the barriers to is about protecting democracy, from anti-democratic forces such as organised racism and xenophobia."

Chris Spurgeon, an English teacher at Hamilton Community College in Leicester describes a school project which encourages students in Years 7 and 8 to consider how and why they have ended up in that school in the City and to explore their physical journeys and feelings. It includes established students from white and Asian communities as well as new arrivals from countries as diverse as Zimbabwe, Portugal and Kosovo. It focuses on the many cultures and on the challenges facing the city.

Tasneem Ibrahim, a research assistant in the Centre for Citizenship Studies in Education (CCSE) at the University of Leicester draws on her experience as a project officer in the Department for International Development - funded project on the national global dimension data base of resources for teachers (

Former CCSE colleague Dr Raul Pardinaz-Solis, now based at Skillshare International in Leicester explains how we have trained East Midlands teachers to develop global perspectives in the classroom.

Clive Billingham, advisory teacher for multicultural education in Leicester, describes a project undertaken in partnership with Leicestershire Police and the Haymarket Theatre as a result of police concerns about racist abuse of Asian women by children on a local housing estate. He describes how he worked with children at Merrydale Junior School and Northfield House Primary to make a video which is now used by schools across the city and nationally to raise awareness about racial bullying and harassment. He says: This resource helps schools to explore racist harassment as a specific and identifiable form of anti-social behaviour, with deep historical roots and significant social consequences. The ’Throwing Stones’ video provides opportunities for teachers to work with children to discuss these issues.

Professor Audrey Osler says: “Leicester teachers have considerable expertise in working with children to increase their understanding of cultural diversity and challenge racism. At the Centre for Citizenship Studies in Education we aim to support teachers in sharing the expertise with their colleagues across the country.”

The teachers’ journal ’Race Equality Teaching’ provides excellent practical advice for teachers - both those working in multicultural environments like Leicester and those working in rural environments with children who have little direct experience of other cultures.

Ather Mirza | alfa
Further information:

More articles from Social Sciences:

nachricht New population data provide insight on aging, migration
31.08.2016 | International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

nachricht PRB projects world population rising 33 percent by 2050 to nearly 10 billion
25.08.2016 | Population Reference Bureau

All articles from Social Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Etching Microstructures with Lasers

Ultrafast lasers have introduced new possibilities in engraving ultrafine structures, and scientists are now also investigating how to use them to etch microstructures into thin glass. There are possible applications in analytics (lab on a chip) and especially in electronics and the consumer sector, where great interest has been shown.

This new method was born of a surprising phenomenon: irradiating glass in a particular way with an ultrafast laser has the effect of making the glass up to a...

Im Focus: Light-driven atomic rotations excite magnetic waves

Terahertz excitation of selected crystal vibrations leads to an effective magnetic field that drives coherent spin motion

Controlling functional properties by light is one of the grand goals in modern condensed matter physics and materials science. A new study now demonstrates how...

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Scientists develop a semiconductor nanocomposite material that moves in response to light

In a paper in Scientific Reports, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute describes a novel light-activated phenomenon that could become the basis for applications as diverse as microscopic robotic grippers and more efficient solar cells.

A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a revolutionary, light-activated semiconductor nanocomposite material that can be used...

Im Focus: Diamonds aren't forever: Sandia, Harvard team create first quantum computer bridge

By forcefully embedding two silicon atoms in a diamond matrix, Sandia researchers have demonstrated for the first time on a single chip all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together.

"People have already built small quantum computers," says Sandia researcher Ryan Camacho. "Maybe the first useful one won't be a single giant quantum computer...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

Agricultural Trade Developments and Potentials in Central Asia and the South Caucasus

14.10.2016 | Event News

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016 | Event News

Latest News

How nanoscience will improve our health and lives in the coming years

27.10.2016 | Materials Sciences

OU-led team discovers rare, newborn tri-star system using ALMA

27.10.2016 | Physics and Astronomy

'Neighbor maps' reveal the genome's 3-D shape

27.10.2016 | Life Sciences

More VideoLinks >>>