Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Bar Characteristics, Women’s Behavior in Bars Tied to Their Risk for Bar-Related Aggression

02.03.2004


Environmental characteristics of bars, as well as women’s behavior in bars, influence their risk for bar-related aggression, according to a study conducted by researchers in the University at Buffalo’s Research Institute on Addictions (RIA).

The study showed that heavy drinking, going to and leaving a bar with individuals not well-known to the women and talking to a greater number of individuals while in the bar environment are social behaviors associated with bar-related aggression. The competitive activity of playing pool and illegal activities involving drug sales or prostitution in a bar were identified as increasing the risk of severe physical aggression.

Results of the study were published in the December 2003 issue of the Journal of Interpersonal Violence.



While emphasizing that "women are not to blame for their victimization," Amy M. Buddie, Ph.D., first author on the study, noted that "women who tend to frequent certain kinds of bars and engage in certain kinds of behavior while at these bars are more likely to experience bar-related aggression." A former postdoctoral fellow with RIA, Buddie is an assistant professor in the Psychology Department at Kennesaw State University in Georgia. Her co-author on the study was Kathleen A. Parks, Ph.D., RIA senior scientist.

Studies have shown that women are most likely to experience aggression from strangers in bars and from people they know in their homes.

Parks said the study’s findings are consistent with previous research that found certain bar characteristics to be associated with aggression. The results, she added, "hopefully will aid in the development of future education and prevention efforts."

The study included 198 women with an average age of 29 who were considered at relatively high-risk and drank in bars at least once a month. They reported drinking an average of six drinks on a typical night at their usual bar.

The majority of the volunteer subjects reported going to their usual bar with two to four people (62 percent) who typically were friends (71 percent), usually leaving with a friend (63 percent) and buying their own drinks (63 percent).

The majority of the bars they visited provided dancing (75 percent), pool (64 percent), darts (70 percent) and food (68 percent). Nearly half of the usual bars were described as having overt drug use (43 percent), with more than one quarter having drug sales (28 percent) and gambling (29 percent).

Sixty-eight percent of the women were white; 26 percent were black. Seventy-two percent had some college education and 58 percent had never been married. Eighty-six percent of the subjects were employed full- or part-time with a median household income between $20,000 and $30,000.

The research was supported by grants awarded to Parks from the Alcoholic Beverage Medical Research Foundation and the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.

The Research Institute on Addictions has been a leader in the study of addictions since 1970 and a research center of the University at Buffalo since 1999.

The University at Buffalo is a premier research-intensive public university, the largest and most comprehensive campus in the State University of New York. UB’s more than 27,000 students pursue their academic interests through more than 300 undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs.

Kathleen Weaver | University at Buffalo
Further information:
http://www.buffalo.edu/news/fast-execute.cgi/article-page.html?article=66000009

More articles from Social Sciences:

nachricht Fixating on faces
26.01.2017 | California Institute of Technology

nachricht Internet use in class tied to lower test scores
16.12.2016 | Michigan State University

All articles from Social Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Positrons as a new tool for lithium ion battery research: Holes in the electrode

22.02.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

New insights into the information processing of motor neurons

22.02.2017 | Life Sciences

Healthy Hiking in Smart Socks

22.02.2017 | Innovative Products

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>