Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

On the Black Market of Cultures

23.04.2008
Using the example of black market organization, as well as that of the unleashed urban development on the fringes of European cities, a research team in collaboration with the Vienna University of Technology (TU Vienna) investigated cultural networks in the form of international art and architectural projects and urban initiatives.

Mirroring human cohabitation, they offer a valuable contribution to the understanding of a new world order, which is particularly sensitive to troubled regions and melting pots in Europe.

Vienna (TU). - Professor Peter Mörtenböck from the Institute of Art and Design of the TU Vienna together with his colleague researcher Helge Mooshammer from IFK (Internationales Forschungszentrum Kulturwissenschaften - International Research Center for Cultural Studies) investigated three vast informal markets in Moscow, Istanbul, and Bosnia (Brcko) as part of an EU Project entitled "Networked Cultures" that has been going on since 2005.

"Various art initiatives reflect upon the cultural transformation in Europe that has been caused by spatial conflicts, migration, new mobility, and global economics. If we think of geopolitical sites like Kosovo, Bosnia, Istanbul between Europe and Asia, Russia, it becomes clear that new spatial structures emerge between various regions. But these spaces are in the first place not only geographical territories, but they also have imaginary and symbolic borders that become accessible particularly through art," explains Peter Mörtenböck. The networks that are woven between these art and architectural activities act as mediators and as operational fields in a proliferous and global entanglement of people, places, and interests.

A book with the same title "Networked Cultures," that was launched in Bregenz on April 17 and came out in collaboration with the Netherlands Architecture Institute (NAi) and the Goldsmiths College of the University of London, encompasses, based on selected projects and four theses, the cultural dynamics on the continent that tie cultural networks together into a European map. Around 50 interviews with groups and individuals that work in the fields of art and architecture, curators, theorists, and activists, cover among others the questions "what does informal organization look like in Europe?" and "what forms of cultural interaction emerge in such a new production manner of space, politics, and knowledge?" Mörtenböck: "Markets like the Cherkizovsky in Moscow, established during the Gorbachev era, emerge without any proper legal structures. Art projects have only recently begun to produce an engagement with these sites. These illicit activities as well as the building of informal settlements (e.g. hundreds of Roma settlements around Belgrade) meet the public eye through art projects. Art makes these activities, which sustain the livelihood of a society, transparent, and contributes to the understanding of a new constantly changing world order."

This project, which will continue until 2009 and will be presented in cities like New York, Toronto, Berlin, London, Istanbul, Moscow, Belgrade, and Rio de Janeiro, has also generated a homepage as a collaboration platform and meeting point of already more than 1,000 art and architectural initiatives: www.networkedcultures.org

Fotodownload: https://www.tuwien.ac.at/index.php?id=7238

For further inquiries, please contact:
Professor Peter Mörtenböck
Institute of Art and Design
Vienna University of Technology
Karlsplatz 13/E264, A-1040 Vienna
Telephone: +43/1/58801 - 26417
Cell phone: +44/7914578994
Email: moertenboeck@tuwien.ac.at
Spokesperson:
Daniela Hallegger, M.A. / M.S.
TU Vienna - PR and Communication
Karlsplatz 13/E011, A-1040 Vienna
Telephone: +43-1-58801-41027
Fax: +43-1-58801-41093
Email: daniela.hallegger@tuwien.ac.at

Werner Sommer | idw
Further information:
http://www.tuwien.ac.at/pr

More articles from Social Sciences:

nachricht Fixating on faces
26.01.2017 | California Institute of Technology

nachricht Internet use in class tied to lower test scores
16.12.2016 | Michigan State University

All articles from Social Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Safe glide at total engine failure with ELA-inside

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded after a glide flight with an Airbus A320 in ditching on the Hudson River. All 155 people on board were saved.

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded...

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

New technology offers fast peptide synthesis

28.02.2017 | Life Sciences

WSU research advances energy savings for oil, gas industries

28.02.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Who can find the fish that makes the best sound?

28.02.2017 | Information Technology

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>