Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Rational family structure dominates

16.11.2010
Couples do not live together for traditional or romantic reasons. They do so for purely rational reasons - emotional, financial, intellectual and social. The nuclear family still holds a strong position in Sweden. Some 70 percent of the population live in a nuclear family, shows research from the University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
Many families today consist of networks of various people that include a whole host of constellations, without being a nuclear family.

Family researchers are at any rate pleased at the break up of the nuclear family, and the late 20th century is of particular interest to those who specialise in to family research.

Not giving enough
“The number of divorces in Sweden and other countries increased dramatically during the 1960s and 70s. A new form of relationship began to emerge in modern society, with people no longer forming partnerships and living together for traditional or romantic reasons. The new relationship takes a rational approach, where people ask what the relationship is giving them and what they get in exchange emotionally, financially, intellectually and socially. The answer often shows that the relationship is not giving enough in return, which explains the increase in the number of divorces in our part of the world, with reference to research carried out by the English sociologist Anthony Giddens and others,” says Thomas Johansson, Professor of education specialising in child and youth studies at the Department of Education, Communication and Learning.

Studies of family structures during the 2000s are therefore about how people live together today, people's motivation for doing so and how the various, and often new, types of families organise their lives in practical terms.

Complicated business
The fact is that just under 70 percent of Sweden’s population live in nuclear families today. The heterosexual nuclear family is the dominant structure.

“But there are many variations, including homosexual families and rainbow families. Thirty percent is quite a high proportion of people not living in a nuclear family,” says Thomas Johansson.

Time and relationship planning among the 30 percent who live in non-nuclear families is often a complicated business.

The new paternal role is one aspect of the family that has been present since the 1970s. It is associated with the new parental insurance that was introduced in Sweden in 1974, enabling families to choose to allow dads to stay at home with young children.

“The thing that is unique to Sweden is the system of parental leave, with 390 days on 80-90 percent pay, depending on the employer. The allocation of two months of parental leave solely to one of the parents is also unique.”

Major variations
“We have a tendency towards equality in Sweden, but there are also major variations when it comes to class and ethnicity, which leads to different outcomes in relation to becoming a father and equality. Parents today think along more equal lines, particularly among the middle classes,” says Thomas Johansson.

The family structure of the 2000s also embraces a global aspect – everything from the unaccompanied refugee children who come to Sweden, to the rich, mobile and transnational family that perhaps lives in Australia, where someone works in Holland for example, and they have relatives in Sweden.

Thomas Johansson was appointed Professor in education specialising in child and youth studies at the Department of Education, Communication and Learning in the spring.

In October he gave a talk entitled “The Family in Modern Society” at an open lecture at the Faculty of Education.

Thomas Johansson has written several books on the theme of family life, including “Den andre föräldern” (The Other Parent), “Nätverksfamiljen” (The Network Family) - together with Margareta Bäck-Wiklund - and “Familjeliv” (Family Life). In the latter book he looks broadly at recent family research and highlights several issues, including the network family. His most recent publication is “Nya svenska fäder” (New Swedish Fathers) from 2010 – written together with Roger Klinth - which is a study into fathers today.

The lecture was one of a series of open lectures that were held during the autumn at the Faculty of Education.

Thomas Johansson
+46 31-786 2003
thomas.johansson@ped.gu.se

Helena Aaberg | idw
Further information:
http://www.gu.se

More articles from Social Sciences:

nachricht Sibling differences: Later-borns choose less prestigious programs at university
14.11.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für demografische Forschung

nachricht Visual intelligence is not the same as IQ
09.11.2017 | Vanderbilt University

All articles from Social Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: First-of-its-kind chemical oscillator offers new level of molecular control

DNA molecules that follow specific instructions could offer more precise molecular control of synthetic chemical systems, a discovery that opens the door for engineers to create molecular machines with new and complex behaviors.

Researchers have created chemical amplifiers and a chemical oscillator using a systematic method that has the potential to embed sophisticated circuit...

Im Focus: Long-lived storage of a photonic qubit for worldwide teleportation

MPQ scientists achieve long storage times for photonic quantum bits which break the lower bound for direct teleportation in a global quantum network.

Concerning the development of quantum memories for the realization of global quantum networks, scientists of the Quantum Dynamics Division led by Professor...

Im Focus: Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wake

Detailed calculations show water cloaks are feasible with today's technology

Researchers have developed a water cloaking concept based on electromagnetic forces that could eliminate an object's wake, greatly reducing its drag while...

Im Focus: Scientists channel graphene to understand filtration and ion transport into cells

Tiny pores at a cell's entryway act as miniature bouncers, letting in some electrically charged atoms--ions--but blocking others. Operating as exquisitely sensitive filters, these "ion channels" play a critical role in biological functions such as muscle contraction and the firing of brain cells.

To rapidly transport the right ions through the cell membrane, the tiny channels rely on a complex interplay between the ions and surrounding molecules,...

Im Focus: Towards data storage at the single molecule level

The miniaturization of the current technology of storage media is hindered by fundamental limits of quantum mechanics. A new approach consists in using so-called spin-crossover molecules as the smallest possible storage unit. Similar to normal hard drives, these special molecules can save information via their magnetic state. A research team from Kiel University has now managed to successfully place a new class of spin-crossover molecules onto a surface and to improve the molecule’s storage capacity. The storage density of conventional hard drives could therefore theoretically be increased by more than one hundred fold. The study has been published in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

Over the past few years, the building blocks of storage media have gotten ever smaller. But further miniaturization of the current technology is hindered by...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

AKL’18: The opportunities and challenges of digitalization in the laser industry

07.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Engineers program tiny robots to move, think like insects

15.12.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

One in 5 materials chemistry papers may be wrong, study suggests

15.12.2017 | Materials Sciences

New antbird species discovered in Peru by LSU ornithologists

15.12.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>