Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Language vitality barometer toolkit for detecting endangered languages now freely available online

11.02.2014
Tools and database of the EU project ELDIA now generally accessible / Wake-up call to policymakers to help save endangered languages

The EuLaViBar language vitality barometer is a tool that can be used to determine the extent to which a language is threatened with extinction.

Academics from eight universities in six European countries developed the barometer during a three-and-a-half year project sponsored by the European Union. It is now available to anybody interested online at www.eldia-project.org/index.php/eulavibar.

"We originally developed the barometer for the purpose of analyzing Finno-Ugric minority languages, some of which are very much in danger of dying out," explained Professor Anneli Sarhimaa of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU), who headed up the study. "However, the language vitality barometer can generally be applied to all languages threatened with extinction."

The barometer is designed to help policymakers and stakeholders identify languages that are at particular risk. The information provided by the barometer is based on empirical data extracted from surveys. Once particularly critical linguistic domains have been identified, it should then be possible to put in place targeted measures and use available resources efficiently.

The European Union supplied EUR 2.7 million to fund the European Language Diversity for All (ELIDIA) project between 2010 and 2013. The project consortium welcomes scholars from around the world to use the ELDIA database at Mainz University for their own academic research on endangered and revitalizing languages. Information about the database is available online at www.eldia-project.org/index.php/eldiadata.

Illustration:
http://www.uni-mainz.de/bilder_presse/05_english_sneb_eldia_02.jpg
The vitality status of Karelian in Finland according to the EuLaViBar: The chart indicates that the status of the language here is very worrying. In terms of the main parameters "Capacity" and "Language Products," Karelian in Finland is critically endangered while in terms of "Opportunity" and "Desire" the language is seriously endangered. [Key: Language usage (green), Education (red), Legislation (yellow), Media (blue)]

source: © www.eldia-project.org

Futher information:
Professor Dr. Anneli Sarhimaa
Northern European and Baltic Languages and Cultures (SNEB)
Department of English and Linguistics
Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz
D 55099 Mainz, GERMANY
phone +49 6131 39-23081 or 39-23080
fax +49 6131 39-23973
e-mail: sarhimaa@uni-mainz.de
http://www.sneb.uni-mainz.de/univ-prof-dr-anneli-sarhimaa/
Weitere Informationen:
http://www.eldia-project.org/
- The ELDIA Project
https://www.facebook.com/pages/ELDIA-European-Language-Diversity-for-All/109989592360850

- ELDIA

Petra Giegerich | idw
Further information:
http://www.uni-mainz.de

More articles from Social Sciences:

nachricht Penn and German researchers help identify neural basis of multitasking
02.09.2015 | University of Pennsylvania

nachricht Older people getting smarter, but not fitter
01.09.2015 | International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

All articles from Social Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: How wind sculpted Earth's largest dust deposit

China's Loess Plateau was formed by wind alternately depositing dust or removing dust over the last 2.6 million years, according to a new report from University of Arizona geoscientists. The study is the first to explain how the steep-fronted plateau formed.

China's Loess Plateau was formed by wind alternately depositing dust or removing dust over the last 2.6 million years, according to a new report from...

Im Focus: An engineered surface unsticks sticky water droplets

The leaves of the lotus flower, and other natural surfaces that repel water and dirt, have been the model for many types of engineered liquid-repelling surfaces. As slippery as these surfaces are, however, tiny water droplets still stick to them. Now, Penn State researchers have developed nano/micro-textured, highly slippery surfaces able to outperform these naturally inspired coatings, particularly when the water is a vapor or tiny droplets.

Enhancing the mobility of liquid droplets on rough surfaces could improve condensation heat transfer for power-plant heat exchangers, create more efficient...

Im Focus: Increasingly severe disturbances weaken world's temperate forests

Longer, more severe, and hotter droughts and a myriad of other threats, including diseases and more extensive and severe wildfires, are threatening to transform some of the world's temperate forests, a new study published in Science has found. Without informed management, some forests could convert to shrublands or grasslands within the coming decades.

"While we have been trying to manage for resilience of 20th century conditions, we realize now that we must prepare for transformations and attempt to ease...

Im Focus: OU astrophysicist and collaborators find supermassive black holes in quasar nearest Earth

A University of Oklahoma astrophysicist and his Chinese collaborator have found two supermassive black holes in Markarian 231, the nearest quasar to Earth, using observations from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope.

The discovery of two supermassive black holes--one larger one and a second, smaller one--are evidence of a binary black hole and suggests that supermassive...

Im Focus: What would a tsunami in the Mediterranean look like?

A team of European researchers have developed a model to simulate the impact of tsunamis generated by earthquakes and applied it to the Eastern Mediterranean. The results show how tsunami waves could hit and inundate coastal areas in southern Italy and Greece. The study is published today (27 August) in Ocean Science, an open access journal of the European Geosciences Union (EGU).

Though not as frequent as in the Pacific and Indian oceans, tsunamis also occur in the Mediterranean, mainly due to earthquakes generated when the African...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Networking conference in Heidelberg for outstanding mathematicians and computer scientists

20.08.2015 | Event News

Scientists meet in Münster for the world’s largest Chitin und Chitosan Conference

20.08.2015 | Event News

Large agribusiness management strategies

19.08.2015 | Event News

 
Latest News

Tiny Drops of Early Universe 'Perfect' Fluid

02.09.2015 | Physics and Astronomy

Learning from Nature: Genomic database standard alleviates search for novel antibiotics

02.09.2015 | Life Sciences

International research project gets high level of funding

02.09.2015 | Awards Funding

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>