Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

EU cooperation project coordinated by Mainz Univ. to develop international Medieval Studies Program

09.10.2014

Focus on providing students with skills and professional orientation to improve their future career prospects

At first glance, it would appear that studies on the culture and literature of the Middle Ages have no immediate link to the modern working world. For this reason students of the related disciplines often feel inadequately prepared for the job market.

In fact, students majoring in Medieval Studies do acquire competencies, such as intercultural skills, that can be very important for their subsequent careers. It is with this in view that an EU-sponsored cooperation project coordinated by Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) has been initiated to develop an international degree program that will focus on the acquisition of professional skills and will have a career-relevant orientation.

Ten European universities from nine countries and three non-university partners are all participating in the project. The EU will be providing EUR 380,000 to fund this "Textual and Literary Cultures in Medieval Europe (TALC_ME)" consortium over the next three years.

The partners will be considering the question of what role the academic analysis of medieval literature and culture can play in a postnational Europe and what relevance it can have for university students in terms of their relationship with their own cultural identity.

"In the context of academic scholarship, Medieval Studies need to be perceived from the pan-European and interdisciplinary perspective both now and in the future," explained project coordinator Professor Stephan Jolie of the German Department at Mainz University.

"The primary objective of Medieval Studies is to examine the complex cultural interactions and transmission processes between the various European language areas and also to reveal the mechanisms of historical change that separate us from the Middle Ages together with those factors that continue to link us with this era."

The aim of the project is to explore what form a post- and transnational university course might take when students and lecturers from various European and possibly also non-European countries are brought together with their various native languages, different university systems, and academic cultures unique to their countries.

In this, TALC_ME plans to use the study of pre-modern German literature as an example to design a degree program for German literature in the European Middle Ages, which can then serve as a model for an international, interdisciplinary, and job-oriented Master's degree program in Humanities and Cultural Studies.

Project participants in addition to Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, which is acting as main applicant and coordinator, are the University of Porto (Portugal), the University of Palermo (Italy), the University of Santiago de Compostela (Spain), the University of Urbino "Carlo Bo" (Italy), the University of Amsterdam (Netherlands), the University of Salzburg (Austria), Stockholm University (Sweden), Palacký University Olomouc (Czech Republic), and the University of Luxembourg (Luxembourg).

The non-university partners include businesses and organizations from the media and public culture sectors that represent potential professional fields for students: the German newspaper Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, the Gutenberg Museum Mainz and the Institut français Mainz.

The initial inspiration for the project resulted from JGU's close collaboration with Professor John Greenfield, who was the first winner of the Mainz University’s Gutenberg Teaching Award and is a Professor of German Studies and Literature at the University of Porto.

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.uni-mainz.de/presse/17644_ENG_HTML.php - press release

Petra Giegerich | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

More articles from Social Sciences:

nachricht Fixating on faces
26.01.2017 | California Institute of Technology

nachricht Internet use in class tied to lower test scores
16.12.2016 | Michigan State University

All articles from Social Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Prediction: More gas-giants will be found orbiting Sun-like stars

22.02.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Researchers identify cause of hereditary skeletal muscle disorder

22.02.2017 | Health and Medicine

Positrons as a new tool for lithium ion battery research: Holes in the electrode

22.02.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>