Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Neuromorphic Computer Coming Online

16.03.2016

Web based application workshop for prospective users on 22 March

The novel, brain-inspired computing system BrainScaleS will be launched at the Kirchhoff Institute for Physics of Heidelberg University. A workshop will inform about possible applications of the neuromorphic system now coming online.

The workshop is addressed to users from academic research, industry and education and will be broadcasted as a web stream on 22 March 2016 from 3 pm to 6 pm CET. The BrainScaleS system has been constructed by an international research team led by Prof. Dr. Karlheinz Meier in the framework of the Human Brain Project (HBP) funded by the European Commission.

Neuromorphic computers mimic aspects of architectures and principles found in biological brains on silicon chips. “The Heidelberg BrainScaleS system goes beyond the paradigms of a Turing machine and the von Neumann architecture, both formulated during the middle of the 20th century by the computer pioneers Alan Turing and John von Neumann.

It is neither executing a sequence of instructions nor is it constructed as a system of physically separated computing and memory units. It is rather a direct, silicon based image of the neuronal networks found in nature, realising cells, connections and inter-cell communications by means of modern analogue and digital microelectronics,” explains Prof. Meier.

The recently completed system is composed of 20 silicon wafers with a total of four million neurons and a billion dynamic synaptic connections. Learn and developmental processes can be emulated with a thousand fold acceleration over real time, so that a biological day can be compressed to 100 seconds on the machine.

Beyond basic research on self organisation in neural networks, potential applications are for example in energy and time efficient realisations of Deep Learning, a technology developed by companies like Google and Facebook for the analysis of large data volumes using conventional high performance computers.

In parallel to the launch of the Heidelberg BrainScaleS system a complementary system with comparable size called SpiNNaker will become operational at the University of Manchester (UK). Led by the computer scientist Prof. Dr. Steve Furber, co-designer of the ARM chip architecture in the 1980s, a large-scale system consisting of 500.000 densely interconnected ARM cores was constructed there.

Also this system will be introduced during the web based workshop on 22 March. Together, the systems located in Heidelberg and Manchester constitute the “Neuromorphic Computing Platform” of the Human Brain Project.

The European developments are based on two previous European projects, FACETS and BrainScaleS, funded from 2005 to 2015 by the “Future Emerging Technologies” (FET) scheme of the European Commission, and on the national project SpiNNaker in the UK. With the two new machines now coming online Europe has a strong position in hardware development in the field of alternative computing. In the USA, the IBM Research Laboratory in Almaden (California) has developed the TrueNorth Chip, yet another approach, which is complementary to both of the European systems.

Contact:
Prof. Dr. Karlheinz Meier
Kirchhoff Institute for Physics
Phone +49 6221 54-9831
meierk@kip.uni-heidelberg.de

Communications and Marketing
Press Office, phone +49 6221 54-2311
presse@rektorat.uni-heidelberg.de

Weitere Informationen:

Workshop 22 March – http://neuromorphic.eu

Marietta Fuhrmann-Koch | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

More articles from Seminars Workshops:

nachricht Virtual Worlds: Research Trends in Mobile 3D Data Collection
30.11.2016 | Fraunhofer IPM

nachricht 4th UKP-Workshop 2017 – Save the Date!
15.09.2016 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Lasertechnik ILT

All articles from Seminars Workshops >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: How to inflate a hardened concrete shell with a weight of 80 t

At TU Wien, an alternative for resource intensive formwork for the construction of concrete domes was developed. It is now used in a test dome for the Austrian Federal Railways Infrastructure (ÖBB Infrastruktur).

Concrete shells are efficient structures, but not very resource efficient. The formwork for the construction of concrete domes alone requires a high amount of...

Im Focus: Bacterial Pac Man molecule snaps at sugar

Many pathogens use certain sugar compounds from their host to help conceal themselves against the immune system. Scientists at the University of Bonn have now, in cooperation with researchers at the University of York in the United Kingdom, analyzed the dynamics of a bacterial molecule that is involved in this process. They demonstrate that the protein grabs onto the sugar molecule with a Pac Man-like chewing motion and holds it until it can be used. Their results could help design therapeutics that could make the protein poorer at grabbing and holding and hence compromise the pathogen in the host. The study has now been published in “Biophysical Journal”.

The cells of the mouth, nose and intestinal mucosa produce large quantities of a chemical called sialic acid. Many bacteria possess a special transport system...

Im Focus: Newly proposed reference datasets improve weather satellite data quality

UMD, NOAA collaboration demonstrates suitability of in-orbit datasets for weather satellite calibration

"Traffic and weather, together on the hour!" blasts your local radio station, while your smartphone knows the weather halfway across the world. A network of...

Im Focus: Repairing defects in fiber-reinforced plastics more efficiently

Fiber-reinforced plastics (FRP) are frequently used in the aeronautic and automobile industry. However, the repair of workpieces made of these composite materials is often less profitable than exchanging the part. In order to increase the lifetime of FRP parts and to make them more eco-efficient, the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) and the Apodius GmbH want to combine a new measuring device for fiber layer orientation with an innovative laser-based repair process.

Defects in FRP pieces may be production or operation-related. Whether or not repair is cost-effective depends on the geometry of the defective area, the tools...

Im Focus: NASA moon data provides more accurate 2017 eclipse path

On Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, millions in the U.S. will have their eyes to the sky as they witness a total solar eclipse. The moon's shadow will race across the United States, from Oregon to South Carolina. The path of this shadow, also known as the path of totality, is where observers will see the moon completely cover the sun. And thanks to elevation data of the moon from NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, or LRO, coupled with detailed NASA topography data of Earth, we have the most accurate maps of the path of totality for any eclipse to date.

On Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, millions in the U.S. will have their eyes to the sky as they witness a total solar eclipse. The moon's shadow will race across the...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

Nothing will happen without batteries making it happen!

05.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Sensory Stimuli Control Dopamine in the Brain

13.01.2017 | Life Sciences

What makes erionite carcinogenic?

13.01.2017 | Earth Sciences

Modeling magma to find copper

13.01.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>