Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Tekes invested 516 million euros in R&D and innovation

28.01.2009
In 2008, Tekes - the Finnish Funding Agency for Technology and Innovation invested a total of EUR 516 million in research, development and innovation projects, with most of them aimed at the top in their respective sectors.

The recession underlined the great need for and key role played by public funding in sustaining research and development during an economic downswing.

“During a recession, there is a risk that companies and public-sector organisations cut back on R&D and innovation. This will undermine their competitiveness when the economy picks up again. Therefore, it’s extremely important to encourage companies and public entities to stick to their R&D plans during a downswing,"says Dr Veli-Pekka Saarnivaara, Director General of Tekes

"When the economy is sluggish, the impact of public incentives in support of innovation is more tangible while at the same time the need for public financing increases. Government incentives help ensure that companies are in full swing when the economy recovers."

Hundreds of products, services and patent applications generated by the projects

Nearly 2,000 projects funded by Tekes were completed in 2008, generating close to 500 products, approx. 450 services and over 270 production processes. Additionally, the projects spawned almost 800 patent applications and over 1,000 theses.

The long-term effects of R&D and innovation activities will be reflected in the emergence of new companies and forms of business, corporate growth and internationalisation, and improved national competitiveness.

R&D and innovation projects worth one billion euros

In 2008, Tekes invested 516 million euros in close to 2,000 research and development projects, the total spending amounting to nearly one billion. Of this, corporate R&D and innovation accounted for 293 million euros and research at public universities, polytechnics and research institutes for 223 million euros. In terms of complexity and technology, most projects represented the highest level of advancement, at least by national standards.

In 2008, the demand for Tekes funding fell slightly when compared to the year before. In particular, this was reflected in the number of applications filed by universities and government research institutes. All in all, companies and public organisations field applications for 3,100 projects worth a total of one billion euros.

As a result of legal reforms, Tekes is now in a position to expand its sphere of activity. In 2008, 23 per cent of all the funding provided by Tekes was allocated to service-related innovations. Altogether, non-technological projects, such as business competence, service models, labour market and design, accounted for 37 per cent of the total.

An increasing share of Tekes funding was allocated to projects launched by small and medium-size enterprises. Of all the funding granted to companies, 62 per cent went to SMEs and 80 per cent to firms with fewer than 500 employees. A new form of support introduced in 2008 was the funding intended for young innovative companies in order to substantially accelerate the growth and international expansion of the most promising enterprises.

A little over half of the funding was allocated to Tekes programmes and strategic centres of science, technology and innovation. A total of 30 Tekes programmes and 5 programmes at the strategic centres of science, technology and innovation were in progress at the end of 2008.

International cooperation increased to some extent. Nearly 60 per cent of the funding was allocated to projects involving international cooperation. At the same time, Finnish companies took active part in the calls for proposals in the context of the EU’s 7th Framework Programme. The success rate among Finnish companies was 23 per cent and the total amount of funding to be received by Finland is estimated at 200 million euros.

Eeva Landowski | alfa
Further information:
http://www.tekes.fi/eng

More articles from Science Education:

nachricht Starting school boosts development
11.05.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Bildungsforschung

nachricht New Master’s programme: University of Kaiserslautern educates experts in quantum technology
15.03.2017 | Technische Universität Kaiserslautern

All articles from Science Education >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

Im Focus: Using graphene to create quantum bits

In the race to produce a quantum computer, a number of projects are seeking a way to create quantum bits -- or qubits -- that are stable, meaning they are not much affected by changes in their environment. This normally needs highly nonlinear non-dissipative elements capable of functioning at very low temperatures.

In pursuit of this goal, researchers at EPFL's Laboratory of Photonics and Quantum Measurements LPQM (STI/SB), have investigated a nonlinear graphene-based...

Im Focus: Bacteria harness the lotus effect to protect themselves

Biofilms: Researchers find the causes of water-repelling properties

Dental plaque and the viscous brown slime in drainpipes are two familiar examples of bacterial biofilms. Removing such bacterial depositions from surfaces is...

Im Focus: Hydrogen Bonds Directly Detected for the First Time

For the first time, scientists have succeeded in studying the strength of hydrogen bonds in a single molecule using an atomic force microscope. Researchers from the University of Basel’s Swiss Nanoscience Institute network have reported the results in the journal Science Advances.

Hydrogen is the most common element in the universe and is an integral part of almost all organic compounds. Molecules and sections of macromolecules are...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

Innovation 4.0: Shaping a humane fourth industrial revolution

17.05.2017 | Event News

Media accreditation opens for historic year at European Health Forum Gastein

16.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

New approach to revolutionize the production of molecular hydrogen

22.05.2017 | Materials Sciences

Scientists enlist engineered protein to battle the MERS virus

22.05.2017 | Life Sciences

Experts explain origins of topographic relief on Earth, Mars and Titan

22.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>