Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New high-tech trial paves way for innovative science learning in UK

06.07.2006
Leading science centre in UK pioneers new pedagogical concept with cutting-edge augmented reality technology trial

At-Bristol, one of the leading science centres in UK, jump-starts a series of trials today to examine the use of augmented reality (AR) technology to maximise and foster learning of science among pupils. The trial is the first of its kind to be conducted with schools in the United Kingdom, boosting the potential of making significant contributions to the field of science education.

The breakthrough of using AR enhances pupils’ learning by contextualising subject information and personalising the experience to the individual’s exact profile, knowledge level and interests. In addition, it aims to ‘break’ the walls of science centres, and virtually transfer the information-rich environment into the classroom and vice versa. Therefore, learning benefits are maximised in ways difficult to afford by either schools or science centres alone.

“One of the goals of using AR in science learning is to maximize the impact of information that is provided when the motivation of the student is highest. Feedback from the students participating in the trials have been positive, students have shown to grasp the subject better while at the same time enjoying the novel and interactive learning experience.” Says Edel Fletcher, Physical Science Learning Officer.

The series of trial undertaken by At-Bristol seeks to find out the effectiveness of students’ learning on dynamics of lift in flight using AR. Using the functions of AR and an Aerofoil as subject, students are tasked to investigate how the forces involved in flight change as the angle of the wings makes with the oncoming air change.

Signals from students’ interaction with the exhibit will be read by a wearable mobile AR system and explanations of the physical phenomenon of how planes fly based on their interaction are projected virtually to a headpiece via the mobile AR system.

The series of trials is part of At-Bristol’s collaboration with the pan-European CONNECT project that seeks to explore, test, refine and demonstrate an innovative approach that crosscuts the boundaries between schools, museums, research centers (e.g. observatories) and science centres while involving students and teachers in extended episodes of playful learning.

“These trials mark the final phase of the CONNECT project and another positive infant step towards an ambitious comprehensive educational reform, which supports people’s learning in school and out of school. Informal learning is a key precursor to learning and plays a fundamental role in supplementing the formal learning, the key element to this project is to integrate everyday “free-choice” activities with the formal science curriculum” Says Fletcher.

The technology provides an ambient learning environment, which functions in two distinct and equally important educational modes: the museum and the school mode.

In the museum mode, a student sees the real exhibit as well as visual augmentations provided by the educator via the AR system. Through the school mode, students who do not have access to distant museums or science centres can share the experience of a visiting student via a 2-way audio-visual communication channel. The two groups of students can therefore interact with each other via an audio connection.

Mavis Choong | alfa
Further information:
http://www.at-bristol.org.uk

More articles from Science Education:

nachricht New Master’s programme: University of Kaiserslautern educates experts in quantum technology
15.03.2017 | Technische Universität Kaiserslautern

nachricht Decision-making research in children: Rules of thumb are learned with time
19.10.2016 | Max-Planck-Institut für Bildungsforschung

All articles from Science Education >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Northern oceans pumped CO2 into the atmosphere

27.03.2017 | Earth Sciences

Fingerprint' technique spots frog populations at risk from pollution

27.03.2017 | Life Sciences

Big data approach to predict protein structure

27.03.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>