Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Music proves a hit for young learners

09.09.2004


Exposing babies and young children to music has a positive impact on their learning, researchers from Northumbria University will tell a conference this week.



In addition to enhancing their musical development, it appears to have a significant positive impact on their social development as well as literacy and numeracy.

The conference in Newcastle on Friday (10 September) will reveal the interim findings on a three-year study funded by Youth Music involving 750 children from birth to five-years-old in the North East and Great Yarmouth. The research is being conducted by Jim Clark, the head of pre and school learning and Helen Taylor, head of initial teacher training at Northumbria University.


Funding has allowed trained musicians to go into early years settings one day a week to engage the children in a whole range of musical activity including singing, playing musical instruments and listening to music. The musicians, along with the early years workers, teachers and parents, have been keeping a record of the childrens’ progress. The researchers carried out a baseline profile of the youngsters before the study began and are also tracking their development. A limited number will be tracked through to primary school.

Jim said: “Having trained musicians working with young children on a regular basis is very powerful. It seems to have a significant impact on their musical development and that has knock-on effects on numeracy and literacy.’’

The musical activities have a positive impact in cognitive skills such as understanding patterning (a key concept in numeracy), language rhyming, language structure and anticipation. In addition, music seems to give young children a greater sense of self, develops the idea of taking turns and helps build social interaction. Helen said: “We all use music in our day to day lives far more than we think. For example, we remember phone numbers according rhythmic patterns. In the same way, children pick up the melody of language long before they recognise individual words and music is crucial in building this.’’

She added: “Music is not always taken seriously and is often perceived as a low-status subject. But this research goes a long way towards proving the need for a sustained programme of musical activity in schools.’’

Katrina Alnikizil | alfa
Further information:
http://www.northumbria.ac.uk

More articles from Science Education:

nachricht Classroom in Stuttgart with Li-Fi of Fraunhofer HHI opened
03.11.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Nachrichtentechnik, Heinrich-Hertz-Institut, HHI

nachricht Starting school boosts development
11.05.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Bildungsforschung

All articles from Science Education >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Long-lived storage of a photonic qubit for worldwide teleportation

MPQ scientists achieve long storage times for photonic quantum bits which break the lower bound for direct teleportation in a global quantum network.

Concerning the development of quantum memories for the realization of global quantum networks, scientists of the Quantum Dynamics Division led by Professor...

Im Focus: Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wake

Detailed calculations show water cloaks are feasible with today's technology

Researchers have developed a water cloaking concept based on electromagnetic forces that could eliminate an object's wake, greatly reducing its drag while...

Im Focus: Scientists channel graphene to understand filtration and ion transport into cells

Tiny pores at a cell's entryway act as miniature bouncers, letting in some electrically charged atoms--ions--but blocking others. Operating as exquisitely sensitive filters, these "ion channels" play a critical role in biological functions such as muscle contraction and the firing of brain cells.

To rapidly transport the right ions through the cell membrane, the tiny channels rely on a complex interplay between the ions and surrounding molecules,...

Im Focus: Towards data storage at the single molecule level

The miniaturization of the current technology of storage media is hindered by fundamental limits of quantum mechanics. A new approach consists in using so-called spin-crossover molecules as the smallest possible storage unit. Similar to normal hard drives, these special molecules can save information via their magnetic state. A research team from Kiel University has now managed to successfully place a new class of spin-crossover molecules onto a surface and to improve the molecule’s storage capacity. The storage density of conventional hard drives could therefore theoretically be increased by more than one hundred fold. The study has been published in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

Over the past few years, the building blocks of storage media have gotten ever smaller. But further miniaturization of the current technology is hindered by...

Im Focus: Successful Mechanical Testing of Nanowires

With innovative experiments, researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrums Geesthacht and the Technical University Hamburg unravel why tiny metallic structures are extremely strong

Light-weight and simultaneously strong – porous metallic nanomaterials promise interesting applications as, for instance, for future aeroplanes with enhanced...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

AKL’18: The opportunities and challenges of digitalization in the laser industry

07.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

A whole-body approach to understanding chemosensory cells

13.12.2017 | Health and Medicine

Water without windows: Capturing water vapor inside an electron microscope

13.12.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Cellular Self-Digestion Process Triggers Autoimmune Disease

13.12.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>