Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Prizes recognise crucial role of world’s young scholars

13.08.2008
The brightest new research talent in the science of consciousness came together for the final of the EUROCORES CNCC essay prize, held in Edinburgh on 28th June. Two winners were plucked from a shortlist of six finalists who represented the cream of emerging academics in the field.

The finalists each had the chance to give presentations on their submissions at a day long conference at Edinburgh University. The announcement marked the long awaited culmination of a difficult selection and judging process.

The award, which is part of the ESF’s EUROCORES programme, was aimed at creating a space for promising young researchers to join established scholars from across the scientific and philosophical community and bring their work to a wider audience.

Edinburgh’s own PHD student Dave Ward, and Hong Yu Wong from University College London, were selected as joint winners and each received €1500 for their submissions. Only six out of the total of 44 submissions were eventually shortlisted for the competition. The final six candidates were chosen for the unique contribution they are making to the understanding of consciousness, and all papers will be published in a forthcoming edition of Psyche.

Hong Yu Wong presented a paper on bodily experience and human agency, which examined the crucial role of bodily awareness in the control of action. The paper drew on empirical and conceptual knowledge to demonstrate human agency depends on embodied consciousness.

“It is very nice to win this prize and a big help for my career,” Hong Yu said. "More importantly this was a very interesting competition because it celebrates this kind of interdisciplinary approach and gave us junior scholars an opportunity to interact with and get feedback from established professionals."

Dave Ward’s paper focused on how our knowledge of colour facilitates human action in the world. Dave’s view is that our ability to distinguish colour is a function of how we sort information in our consciousness in order to “sift, sort and track” our perceptions and act accordingly.

“This is a really great honour,” said Dave. “To be chosen from such a talented group of entrants is great, and it was good to have a chance to get some top feedback on my work.”

Following the announcement of the prize-winners, Professor Andy Clark, from Edinburgh University, commented on the quality of talent on show at the conference, and predicted a promising future for a collaborative, interdisciplinary approach to understanding consciousness.

“Interdisciplinary studies of the mind are becoming more and more important,” he said. “Encouraging young scholars like this who are truly empirically informed, interdisciplinary, and excited about the mind – bringing them together and showing them that they can do things like this – I think is incredibly important.

He emphasised that EUROCORES is an essential form of support for helping young research talent make the move into serious cutting edge scholarship.

He continued: “The European Science Foundation is doing a very good job of supporting that. It is just an exciting time to be studying the mind and a therefore a great time to get young scholars interested.”

The idea for the essay prize was born out of an attempt by those working on the EUROCORES programme to allow young researchers an opportunity to present their work to the international academic community. The programme is run by senior scholars in the field and brings together the world’s leading minds in the exploration of human consciousness. Projects across Europe aim to form a complete understanding of mind from both a social and cultural perspective, as well a conceptual and scientific one.

Despite the fact that this work is highly specialised and involves pioneering work at a high level, a lot of the research is carried out by students at PHD level. These young scholars explore detailed conceptual problems and carry out experiments and investigations in crucial areas. Organisers of the EUROCORES programme were conscious of the vital role these contributions make to the overall goal of understanding consciousness. The essay prize aims to recognise this work, and the rich pool of talent that forms the basis of an exciting global project to unravel the mysteries of the mind.

Professor Clark added that an award like this can also help to recognise the powerful contribution graduates are already making to international cutting edge research in the science of consciousness.

He added: “One thing that we have seen here is just how much serious, first author work is being done, by people whose names you probably won’t see in published journals for a few years yet, but who are certainly going to be at the forefront of the next generation.”

Thomas Lau | alfa
Further information:
http://www.esf.org/activities/eurocores/programmes/cncc.html

Further reports about: EUROCORES world’s young scholars

More articles from Science Education:

nachricht New Master’s programme: University of Kaiserslautern educates experts in quantum technology
15.03.2017 | Technische Universität Kaiserslautern

nachricht Decision-making research in children: Rules of thumb are learned with time
19.10.2016 | Max-Planck-Institut für Bildungsforschung

All articles from Science Education >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Making lightweight construction suitable for series production

More and more automobile companies are focusing on body parts made of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP). However, manufacturing and repair costs must be further reduced in order to make CFRP more economical in use. Together with the Volkswagen AG and five other partners in the project HolQueSt 3D, the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) has developed laser processes for the automatic trimming, drilling and repair of three-dimensional components.

Automated manufacturing processes are the basis for ultimately establishing the series production of CFRP components. In the project HolQueSt 3D, the LZH has...

Im Focus: Wonder material? Novel nanotube structure strengthens thin films for flexible electronics

Reflecting the structure of composites found in nature and the ancient world, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have synthesized thin carbon nanotube (CNT) textiles that exhibit both high electrical conductivity and a level of toughness that is about fifty times higher than copper films, currently used in electronics.

"The structural robustness of thin metal films has significant importance for the reliable operation of smart skin and flexible electronics including...

Im Focus: Deep inside Galaxy M87

The nearby, giant radio galaxy M87 hosts a supermassive black hole (BH) and is well-known for its bright jet dominating the spectrum over ten orders of magnitude in frequency. Due to its proximity, jet prominence, and the large black hole mass, M87 is the best laboratory for investigating the formation, acceleration, and collimation of relativistic jets. A research team led by Silke Britzen from the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy in Bonn, Germany, has found strong indication for turbulent processes connecting the accretion disk and the jet of that galaxy providing insights into the longstanding problem of the origin of astrophysical jets.

Supermassive black holes form some of the most enigmatic phenomena in astrophysics. Their enormous energy output is supposed to be generated by the...

Im Focus: A Quantum Low Pass for Photons

Physicists in Garching observe novel quantum effect that limits the number of emitted photons.

The probability to find a certain number of photons inside a laser pulse usually corresponds to a classical distribution of independent events, the so-called...

Im Focus: Microprocessors based on a layer of just three atoms

Microprocessors based on atomically thin materials hold the promise of the evolution of traditional processors as well as new applications in the field of flexible electronics. Now, a TU Wien research team led by Thomas Müller has made a breakthrough in this field as part of an ongoing research project.

Two-dimensional materials, or 2D materials for short, are extremely versatile, although – or often more precisely because – they are made up of just one or a...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Expert meeting “Health Business Connect” will connect international medical technology companies

20.04.2017 | Event News

Wenn der Computer das Gehirn austrickst

18.04.2017 | Event News

7th International Conference on Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaics in Freiburg on April 3-5, 2017

03.04.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Scientist invents way to trigger artificial photosynthesis to clean air

26.04.2017 | Materials Sciences

Ammonium nitrogen input increases the synthesis of anticarcinogenic compounds in broccoli

26.04.2017 | Agricultural and Forestry Science

SwRI-led team discovers lull in Mars' giant impact history

26.04.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>