Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

York students help African schoolchildren to uncover ‘hidden worlds’

13.02.2008
Schoolchildren on African sugar plantations are recreating an insect’s-eye view of the world in art, thanks to a unique ‘Hidden Worlds’ project run by the University of York.

The scheme started on home soil in the schools around York, where staff from the University’s Centre for Novel Agricultural Products (CNAP) took microscopes into primary classrooms and encouraged the children to create artwork based on what they saw.

Before long, staff had been approached by Illovo Sugar, which owns plantations in Tanzania, suggesting that a similar project might benefit Tanzanian schoolchildren.

In the new scheme, volunteers are supplied by Gap Activity Projects, a UK charity which arranges placements for young people, and CNAP staff in the Department of Biology train them as workshop leaders before they travel out to Africa.

Nicola Smith, Schools Officer at CNAP who has just returned from a visit to the project, said: “Schools in Tanzania present rather different challenges from working with York school students. One big problem is simply explaining the concept of ‘magnification’ to a class of upwards of 60 kids whose first language is Swahili.”

Instead of using microscopes immediately volunteers now start with ordinary handheld magnifying glasses – which are themselves a novelty for the children – before introducing the more advanced equipment.

Dr Caroline Calvert, CNAP Outreach Manager, added: “We do our best to encourage creativity. Once the children have had the close-up view of a leaf or an insect, the volunteers get them to paint, draw or model what they saw. At the end of the day, they get to take home what they’ve created – which always goes down well!”

A free exhibition about the project with photographs, children’s artwork and other resources will be on show at the York Festival of Science in York Mansion House every weekday from 12 – 2pm.

David Garner | alfa
Further information:
http://www.york.ac.uk/admin/presspr/pressreleases/africanschoolchildren.htm

More articles from Science Education:

nachricht Starting school boosts development
11.05.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Bildungsforschung

nachricht New Master’s programme: University of Kaiserslautern educates experts in quantum technology
15.03.2017 | Technische Universität Kaiserslautern

All articles from Science Education >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: 3-D scanning with water

3-D shape acquisition using water displacement as the shape sensor for the reconstruction of complex objects

A global team of computer scientists and engineers have developed an innovative technique that more completely reconstructs challenging 3D objects. An ancient...

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

Im Focus: On the way to a biological alternative

A bacterial enzyme enables reactions that open up alternatives to key industrial chemical processes

The research team of Prof. Dr. Oliver Einsle at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Biochemistry has long been exploring the functioning of nitrogenase....

Im Focus: The 1 trillion tonne iceberg

Larsen C Ice Shelf rift finally breaks through

A one trillion tonne iceberg - one of the biggest ever recorded -- has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, after a rift in the ice,...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Ultrathin device harvests electricity from human motion

24.07.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Scientists announce the quest for high-index materials

24.07.2017 | Materials Sciences

ADIR Project: Lasers Recover Valuable Materials

24.07.2017 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>