Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Queen’s study highlights calls for more sharing between schools

21.11.2008
The majority of parents and people involved in education want to see more sharing in and between schools in Northern Ireland, according to a study by Queen’s University.

Education and a Shared Future: Options for sharing and collaboration in Northern Ireland schools was led by the School of Education at Queen’s and funded by the EU PEACE II Extension Programme administered by the Community Relations Council.

The study examines the attitudes of parents and educationalists (including politicians, policy makers and Education and Library Boards) towards sharing in and between schools, and highlights lessons that can be learned from initiatives in Scotland, England and the Republic of Ireland.

Dr David Russell, Visiting Research Fellow at Queen’s School of Education, said: “Sharing in schools can happen in a number of ways, such as pupils from schools with different religious compositions being brought together for some classes, a number of schools sharing the same facilities, and integrated education.

“Our findings demonstrate strong support for collaboration between schools, with over 70 per cent of both parents and educationalists in favour of developing shared facilities. A majority in both groups also support the development of shared campus initiatives where different types of schools could be located on the same site.

“The research found that if there was to be increased sharing then the majority of respondents would support mixed classrooms. 79 per cent of parents and 61 per cent of educationalists believe that children from schools with different religious compositions should at least sometimes be taught in the same classroom.

“Less than 50 per cent of the both groups who took part in the research supported retaining the status quo. While strong public opinion for integrated education was reaffirmed by 69 per cent of parents, only 19 per cent of educationalists who took part held the same view."

The study also examined approaches to shared education in other parts of the UK and Ireland. Dr Philip O’Sullivan, Researcher at the School of Education, said: "Northern Ireland has its own unique circumstances and while it may prove difficult to replicate sharing initiatives from other places, we can learn from experiences elsewhere.

“In Scotland, there are examples of Catholic and non-denominational schools sharing the same site and core facilities. Our research found that in these shared campuses children mixed and shared facilities without any significant antagonism or conflict based on religious identity and without any diminution of schools’ ethos. Moreover, building a shared campus as opposed to two separate schools had significant economic benefits, affording the local authority savings of 25 per cent on capital costs amounting to millions of pounds."

The report contains a number of recommendations to assist education policy makers. The authors concluded that shared education should be based on equality, affording equal recognition to all religious backgrounds and cultural traditions. It should be voluntary and informed by the views and opinions of parents. Steps can be taken to ensure that cultural and religious ethos is strengthened as a result of sharing, rather than being compromised.

'Education and a Shared Future: Options for sharing and collaboration in Northern Ireland schools' is available to download at http://www.schoolsworkingtogether.com/documents/education-and-a-shared-future.pdf and also at http://www.nicrc.org.uk/docs

Anne-Marie Watson | alfa
Further information:
http://www.qub.ac.uk/

Further reports about: Education Ireland Queen’s School Scotland collaboration between schools

More articles from Science Education:

nachricht Studying outdoors is better
06.02.2018 | Technische Universität München

nachricht Classroom in Stuttgart with Li-Fi of Fraunhofer HHI opened
03.11.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Nachrichtentechnik, Heinrich-Hertz-Institut, HHI

All articles from Science Education >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: BAM@Hannover Messe: innovative 3D printing method for space flight

At the Hannover Messe 2018, the Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und-prüfung (BAM) will show how, in the future, astronauts could produce their own tools or spare parts in zero gravity using 3D printing. This will reduce, weight and transport costs for space missions. Visitors can experience the innovative additive manufacturing process live at the fair.

Powder-based additive manufacturing in zero gravity is the name of the project in which a component is produced by applying metallic powder layers and then...

Im Focus: Molecules Brilliantly Illuminated

Physicists at the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics, which is jointly run by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, have developed a high-power laser system that generates ultrashort pulses of light covering a large share of the mid-infrared spectrum. The researchers envisage a wide range of applications for the technology – in the early diagnosis of cancer, for instance.

Molecules are the building blocks of life. Like all other organisms, we are made of them. They control our biorhythm, and they can also reflect our state of...

Im Focus: Spider silk key to new bone-fixing composite

University of Connecticut researchers have created a biodegradable composite made of silk fibers that can be used to repair broken load-bearing bones without the complications sometimes presented by other materials.

Repairing major load-bearing bones such as those in the leg can be a long and uncomfortable process.

Im Focus: Writing and deleting magnets with lasers

Study published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces is the outcome of an international effort that included teams from Dresden and Berlin in Germany, and the US.

Scientists at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) together with colleagues from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) and the University of Virginia...

Im Focus: Gamma-ray flashes from plasma filaments

Novel highly efficient and brilliant gamma-ray source: Based on model calculations, physicists of the Max PIanck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg propose a novel method for an efficient high-brilliance gamma-ray source. A giant collimated gamma-ray pulse is generated from the interaction of a dense ultra-relativistic electron beam with a thin solid conductor. Energetic gamma-rays are copiously produced as the electron beam splits into filaments while propagating across the conductor. The resulting gamma-ray energy and flux enable novel experiments in nuclear and fundamental physics.

The typical wavelength of light interacting with an object of the microcosm scales with the size of this object. For atoms, this ranges from visible light to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Invitation to the upcoming "Current Topics in Bioinformatics: Big Data in Genomics and Medicine"

13.04.2018 | Event News

Unique scope of UV LED technologies and applications presented in Berlin: ICULTA-2018

12.04.2018 | Event News

IWOLIA: A conference bringing together German Industrie 4.0 and French Industrie du Futur

09.04.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Getting electrons to move in a semiconductor

25.04.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Reconstructing what makes us tick

25.04.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Cheap 3-D printer can produce self-folding materials

25.04.2018 | Information Technology

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>