Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Open Science: Research data for everyone

27.05.2014

Magdeburg brain researchers publish the most comprehensive raw data set of natural language processing in the brain. It is freely accessible for interested researchers and the public—hereby allowing broad interdisciplinary collaborations.

Are there researchers who voluntarily share their complete, raw data sets online before even having evaluated the data themselves?


The 7-Tesla MRI scanner at the Leibniz Institute for Neurobiology, which the researchers have used to collect their data.

Center for Behavioral Brain Sciences, OVGU Magdeburg / Photo: D. Mahler


In favor of open science: Michael Hanke (left). His group members Falko Kaule (co-author of the publication, middle) and Alexander Waite stand next to him.

Center for Behavioral Brain Sciences, OVGU Magdeburg / Photo: D. Mahler

Until some time ago, this was unthinkable. Even today, many scientists shy away from permissive data sharing before their results are published—helping strengthen their professional reputation. Magdeburg psychologist Professor Michael Hanke from the Otto von Guericke University Magdeburg has now embarked on a different route altogether with Dr. Jörg Stadler from the Leibniz Institute for Neurobiology and colleagues.

They will publish the most comprehensive set of raw brain imaging data on natural language processing in the inaugural issue of the new open-access journal Scientific Data of the Nature Publishing Group. It is already freely available for analyses from the website http://www.studyforrest.org.

"We have received funds from the Federal Ministry of Education and Research to collect data. Now we see it as our duty to maximize the impact from this research for society," Hanke explains, whose project was funded in the framework of a German-US-American Collaboration within the Bernstein Network of Computational Neuroscience. The brain researchers will now receive professional acknowledgements through citations of their data article.

This open science approach has the advantage of accelerating progress in science. Competing research labs can simultaneously work on a subject without obstructing other scientists’ research plans through delaying the publication of data sets. Also, when scientists are asked to share data, they do not need to laboriously reconstruct past data collections—some inquirires are made years after the first publication—since the raw data have already been prepared for sharing. This saves time and cost, which can be used to further scientific developments.

The published Magdeburg data set focuses on the processing of acoustic stimuli. In the study, participants listened to an audio movie of the classic feature film Forrest Gump. Meanwhile, their brain activity was measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) as it processed language, music, emotions, memories, and visual imagery. Thus, the recordings do not isolate a single aspect of brain function, but instead reflect the real complexity of information flow in everyday listening experiences. In addition to the fMRI data, the scientists provide comprehensive anatomical descriptions of the participants' brains, as well as measurements on breathing and heartbeat. These help indicate the portions of the film when the listener was more excited or relaxed.

With these data, it is possible to study emotion processing during listening experiences—or analyze completely different research questions. Besides Hanke, at least two other research groups in England and Australia are currently evaluating this data. He does not know their specific lines of inquiry, however, there is one thing he is positive about: “professionals from other disciplines—such as engineers—have a very different approach to our data while also possessing the required skills to optimally analyze them for their own use." In order to promote such inter-disciplinary research the Magdeburg Center for Behavioral Brain Sciences has sponsored an award of 5000 EUR for the best use of the published data set.

The German-US-American Collaboration “Development of general high-dimenstional models of neuronal representation space” is an international research project in which scientists at Otto von Guericke University Magdeburg, Dartmouth College (USA), and Princeton University (USA) are involved. It is part of the National Bernstein Network Computational Neuroscience in Germany. With this funding initiative, the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) has supported the new discipline of Computational Neuroscience since 2004 with over 180 million Euros. The network is named after the German physiologist Julius Bernstein (1835-1917).

Contact:
Jun.-Prof. Dr. Michael Hanke
Otto von Guericke University
Institute of Psychology II
39106 Magdeburg
Tel: +49 (0)391 67-18481
Email: michael.hanke@ovgu.de

Original publication:
M. Hanke, F. J. Baumgartner, P. Ibe, F. R. Kaule, S. Pollmann, O. Speck, W. Zinke & J. Stadler (2014): A high-resolution 7-Tesla fMRI dataset from complex natural stimulation with an audio movie. Scientific Data, 1: 140003.
DOI: 10.1038/sdata.2014.3

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.psychoinformatics.de Michael Hanke’s „Psychoinformatics“ Lab
http://www.uni-magdeburg.de Otto von Guericke University Magdeburg
http://www.lin-magdeburg.de Leibniz Institute for Neurobiology
http://www.cbbs.eu Center for Behavioral Brain Sciences, Magdeburg
http://www.nncn.de National Bernstein Network Computational Neuroscience

Mareike Kardinal | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

Further reports about: Bernstein Brain Computational Education Neurobiology Neuroscience fMRI processing publication

More articles from Science Education:

nachricht Classroom in Stuttgart with Li-Fi of Fraunhofer HHI opened
03.11.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Nachrichtentechnik, Heinrich-Hertz-Institut, HHI

nachricht Starting school boosts development
11.05.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Bildungsforschung

All articles from Science Education >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Optical Nanoscope Allows Imaging of Quantum Dots

Physicists have developed a technique based on optical microscopy that can be used to create images of atoms on the nanoscale. In particular, the new method allows the imaging of quantum dots in a semiconductor chip. Together with colleagues from the University of Bochum, scientists from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute reported the findings in the journal Nature Photonics.

Microscopes allow us to see structures that are otherwise invisible to the human eye. However, conventional optical microscopes cannot be used to image...

Im Focus: Artificial agent designs quantum experiments

On the way to an intelligent laboratory, physicists from Innsbruck and Vienna present an artificial agent that autonomously designs quantum experiments. In initial experiments, the system has independently (re)discovered experimental techniques that are nowadays standard in modern quantum optical laboratories. This shows how machines could play a more creative role in research in the future.

We carry smartphones in our pockets, the streets are dotted with semi-autonomous cars, but in the research laboratory experiments are still being designed by...

Im Focus: Scientists decipher key principle behind reaction of metalloenzymes

So-called pre-distorted states accelerate photochemical reactions too

What enables electrons to be transferred swiftly, for example during photosynthesis? An interdisciplinary team of researchers has worked out the details of how...

Im Focus: The first precise measurement of a single molecule's effective charge

For the first time, scientists have precisely measured the effective electrical charge of a single molecule in solution. This fundamental insight of an SNSF Professor could also pave the way for future medical diagnostics.

Electrical charge is one of the key properties that allows molecules to interact. Life itself depends on this phenomenon: many biological processes involve...

Im Focus: Paradigm shift in Paris: Encouraging an holistic view of laser machining

At the JEC World Composite Show in Paris in March 2018, the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT will be focusing on the latest trends and innovations in laser machining of composites. Among other things, researchers at the booth shared with the Aachen Center for Integrative Lightweight Production (AZL) will demonstrate how lasers can be used for joining, structuring, cutting and drilling composite materials.

No other industry has attracted as much public attention to composite materials as the automotive industry, which along with the aerospace industry is a driver...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

10th International Symposium: “Advanced Battery Power – Kraftwerk Batterie” Münster, 10-11 April 2018

08.01.2018 | Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Rutgers scientists discover 'Legos of life'

23.01.2018 | Life Sciences

Seabed mining could destroy ecosystems

23.01.2018 | Earth Sciences

Transportable laser

23.01.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>