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First independent combined university course with a university abroad

13.06.2014

University of Stuttgart and Georgia Tech are establishing a joint master’s degree in Mechanical Engineering

The University of Stuttgart has paired up with one of the most significant technical universities in the world, the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta (USA) to create a joint master’s degree in Maschinenbau/ Mechanical Engineering. From the fall semester 2014/15 masters students from the University of Stuttgart and Georgia Tech will have the opportunity to study two semesters at their ‘home’ university and two semesters at the partner university. This will give them the possibility of gaining a joint degree from two of the most renowned universities.

Following two years of intense planning the contract for the bilateral programme was signed at the beginning of June 2014 by the university rector Prof. Wolfram Ressel and Georgia Tech provost Rafael Bras. While in Atlanta signing the contract Ressel stated “This offer of a joint masters is another step by both universities to internationalise and to coin themselves as technical universities highly valued internationally.”

Prior to the signing a delegation from the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology visited the University of Stuttgart. According to Dr. Paul Neitzel, Associate Chair for Graduate Studies at Georgia Tech, “This joint project offers students from both countries the possibility to expand their technical and cultural horizon and to arrive at a global view, which is necessary in the world today.”

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Professor Oliver Sawodny, vice dean of the 7th faculty: Construction, Production and Automobile Technology at the University of Stuttgart who was responsible for preparing the contract added, “Traditionally rich research and teaching in mechanical engineering are the qualities that make the University of Stuttgart and Atlanta what they are. We are looking forward to developing our relationship and to creating synergies in the subject offers in the interest of our students.”

The joint masters “Maschinenbau/ Mechanical Engineering” will give students the best chances for a successful career in research and business. There are also planned internships in companies, such as Daimler and Bosch. The degree qualifies students for tasks in research and development as well as in management and at the same time creates the foundation for students to pursue doctoral studies, in Europe as well as in the USA.

The Georgia Institute of Technology is regularly ranked in one of the highest places in university ranking. Added to this is the excellent research area, the good relationship between students and lecturers as well as an attractive campus life. Within the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering there are several research groups dealing with the fundamentals and applications of mechanical engineering across disciplines, and through this contributing towards the development of highly modern technology. Mechanical Engineering at the University of Stuttgart distinguishes itself through an outstanding reputation in application-oriented research and is embedded in a unique industrial environment in Europe.

Further information:
Dr. Hans-Herwig Geyer, University of Stuttgart, Head of University Communication and press spokesperson
Tel. 0711/685-82555, Email: hans-herwig.geyer (at) hkom.uni-stuttgart.de

Andrea Mayer-Grenu | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft
Further information:
http://www.uni-stuttgart.de/

Further reports about: Engineering Technology mechanical

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