Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

CHF 755 million for basic research

06.05.2013
Annual Report 2012 of the Swiss National Science Foundation

In 2012, the Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF) was able to invest CHF 755 million in basic research, the highest amount in its sixty-year history. Compared to the previous year, this represents an increase of approximately six per cent.

As stated in the latest annual report, the SNSF approved more than 3500 research proposals to the tune of CHF 755 million. The budget was distributed as follows: 24% humanities and social sciences; 35% mathematics, natural and engineering sciences; 41% biology and medicine. In 2012, the SNSF supported 8750 researchers, half of whom were doctoral students.

Competition for research funds remains fierce
The SNSF invested more than half of its funds – CHF 391 million – in project funding, its main funding scheme. This money will enable numerous researchers to realise their projects. In a welcome development, the chances of researchers obtaining a grant from the SNSF improved in project funding: after declining in recent years, the approval rate (proportion of approved to requested funding) rose again slightly in 2012, namely to 45%. In 2008, before the decline, the approval rate lay at 54%. This is evidence of the continuing fierce competition for SNSF grants.
Joining forces to promote young researchers
The SNSF is convinced that academic careers must become more attractive for young researchers if Switzerland is to maintain its leading position as a research location in the global arena. In 2012, the SNSF launched a variety of measures aimed at improving conditions for young scientists. Hence, researchers are increasingly encouraged to make stays abroad at an early stage in their career as it is later often difficult to have a family and remain mobile at the same time.

Further measures, such as the improvement of employment conditions for doctoral students, are to follow (see Action Plan 2013-2016).

Stringent selection processes are essential to the promotion of young researchers. Only the best doctoral students have the aptitude for an academic career. For this reason, the SNSF applies a very exacting yardstick in the funding schemes Ambizione and SNSF professorships, which aim to improve the prospects of an academic career for talented young researchers. In 2012, only 19% of female candidates and 21% of male candidates managed to clear this hurdle.

The SNSF is aware that the measures for promoting young talents, as envisaged in the Action Plan 2013-2016, will not be sufficient to improve the situation in the long term. It is therefore already vetting new ideas. Furthermore, the SNSF and the higher education institutions must collaborate more closely to create the right incentives for optimising the promotion of young researchers.

Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF)
The SNSF is Switzerland’s foremost institution in the promotion of scientific research and supports approximately 8500 researchers every year. Its core task is the evaluation of research proposals. By awarding public research money based on a competitive system, the SNSF contributes to the high quality of Swiss research. Mandated by the federal authorities, the SNSF supports all academic disciplines, from history via medicine through to the engineering sciences.
Ordering a copy
You can order the Annual Report 2012 in German, French and English as well as all other publications of the SNSF free of charge at www.snsf.ch > About us > Publications of the SNSF
The text of this press release is available on the website of the Swiss National Science Foundation: > www.snsf.ch > Media > Press releases

Contact
Swiss National Science Foundation
Communication division
Telephone +41 (0)31 308 23 78
com@snf.ch

Abteilung Kommunikation | idw
Further information:
http://www.snsf.ch

Further reports about: CHF Gates Foundation SNSF Science TV social science

More articles from Science Education:

nachricht Starting school boosts development
11.05.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Bildungsforschung

nachricht New Master’s programme: University of Kaiserslautern educates experts in quantum technology
15.03.2017 | Technische Universität Kaiserslautern

All articles from Science Education >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Fizzy soda water could be key to clean manufacture of flat wonder material: Graphene

Whether you call it effervescent, fizzy, or sparkling, carbonated water is making a comeback as a beverage. Aside from quenching thirst, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have discovered a new use for these "bubbly" concoctions that will have major impact on the manufacturer of the world's thinnest, flattest, and one most useful materials -- graphene.

As graphene's popularity grows as an advanced "wonder" material, the speed and quality at which it can be manufactured will be paramount. With that in mind,...

Im Focus: Exotic quantum states made from light: Physicists create optical “wells” for a super-photon

Physicists at the University of Bonn have managed to create optical hollows and more complex patterns into which the light of a Bose-Einstein condensate flows. The creation of such highly low-loss structures for light is a prerequisite for complex light circuits, such as for quantum information processing for a new generation of computers. The researchers are now presenting their results in the journal Nature Photonics.

Light particles (photons) occur as tiny, indivisible portions. Many thousands of these light portions can be merged to form a single super-photon if they are...

Im Focus: Circular RNA linked to brain function

For the first time, scientists have shown that circular RNA is linked to brain function. When a RNA molecule called Cdr1as was deleted from the genome of mice, the animals had problems filtering out unnecessary information – like patients suffering from neuropsychiatric disorders.

While hundreds of circular RNAs (circRNAs) are abundant in mammalian brains, one big question has remained unanswered: What are they actually good for? In the...

Im Focus: RAVAN CubeSat measures Earth's outgoing energy

An experimental small satellite has successfully collected and delivered data on a key measurement for predicting changes in Earth's climate.

The Radiometer Assessment using Vertically Aligned Nanotubes (RAVAN) CubeSat was launched into low-Earth orbit on Nov. 11, 2016, in order to test new...

Im Focus: Scientists shine new light on the “other high temperature superconductor”

A study led by scientists of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg presents evidence of the coexistence of superconductivity and “charge-density-waves” in compounds of the poorly-studied family of bismuthates. This observation opens up new perspectives for a deeper understanding of the phenomenon of high-temperature superconductivity, a topic which is at the core of condensed matter research since more than 30 years. The paper by Nicoletti et al has been published in the PNAS.

Since the beginning of the 20th century, superconductivity had been observed in some metals at temperatures only a few degrees above the absolute zero (minus...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Call for Papers – ICNFT 2018, 5th International Conference on New Forming Technology

16.08.2017 | Event News

Sustainability is the business model of tomorrow

04.08.2017 | Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

A Map of the Cell’s Power Station

18.08.2017 | Life Sciences

Engineering team images tiny quasicrystals as they form

18.08.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Researchers printed graphene-like materials with inkjet

18.08.2017 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>