Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


Better protection for wood


Coatings used to protect the exposed wooden parts of buildings have to withstand all kinds of weather. To avoid over-frequent renovation, architects, builders and house-owners are advised to look for a reliable quality label. The relevant European standard is being revised.

A weather-beaten mountain chalet might look charming – but assaults by heat and cold, rain and sunshine, will eventually destroy even highly weather-resistant timber like larch. Outdoor paint or varnish is expected to prolong the life of most types of timber, and of course stand up to years of exposure to the elements.

If the paint begins to flake sooner than the house-owner anticipated, in the worst case the paint manufacturer is likely to find himself faced with a claim for damages. House painters, producers of garden furniture, and architects are not willing to be left carrying the blame. That is why it is advisable to look for a quality label when choosing the appropriate product.

Such a quality label is awarded by the Fraunhofer Institute for Wood Research WKI since two and a half years. It is based on the authoritative but not binding European standard DIN EN 927 (coating materials and coating systems for outdoor wood surfaces). The standard is revised every five years – due this month.

“Manufacturers of wood coatings have long demanded a standard that pays greater heed to practical considerations,” stresses Guido Hora, committee chairman and head of the WKI department for surface technology. “We particularly need new definitions for sample geometry and material properties in Parts 3 and 5 of the standard.” Part 5 defines the laboratory procedures for determining the liquid water permeability of coated timber. Part 3 – recently incorporated in ISO 16053 – specifies the conditions under which open field tests are to be carried out.

Another issue that the committee members intend to discuss during the revision process is the unfortunate predisposition of paints and varnishes to flake away from the underlying surface from the edges inward, as frequently experienced in garden furniture. “Outdoor timber shouldn’t have any sharp edges, but this requirement is often ignored,” Hora reports from experience. “To limit liability for defects of this type, we need to define a minimum standard edge radius. This is likely to lie in the region of two to three millimeters.”

Before a manufacturer’s exterior wood coating product can be sold with the quality seal, it has to pass a number of tests. These can be performed by the company’s own R&D department which, given the growing complexity of consumer product requirements, is often specialized in this activity. Or companies can call on the services of an independent, certified test laboratory like the WKI. To update their knowledge, researchers meet during the 4th Woodcoating Congress to be held in The Hague (Netherlands), October 25 to 27.

Johannes Ehrlenspiel | alfa
Further information:

More articles from Process Engineering:

nachricht Intelligent wheelchairs, predictive prostheses
20.12.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Produktionstechnik und Automatisierung IPA

nachricht Jelly with memory – predicting the leveling of com-mercial paints
15.12.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Produktionstechnik und Automatisierung IPA

All articles from Process Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Mars' oceans formed early, possibly aided by massive volcanic eruptions

Oceans formed before Tharsis and evolved together, shaping climate history of Mars

A new scenario seeking to explain how Mars' putative oceans came and went over the last 4 billion years implies that the oceans formed several hundred million...

Im Focus: Tiny implants for cells are functional in vivo

For the first time, an interdisciplinary team from the University of Basel has succeeded in integrating artificial organelles into the cells of live zebrafish embryos. This innovative approach using artificial organelles as cellular implants offers new potential in treating a range of diseases, as the authors report in an article published in Nature Communications.

In the cells of higher organisms, organelles such as the nucleus or mitochondria perform a range of complex functions necessary for life. In the networks of...

Im Focus: Locomotion control with photopigments

Researchers from Göttingen University discover additional function of opsins

Animal photoreceptors capture light with photopigments. Researchers from the University of Göttingen have now discovered that these photopigments fulfill an...

Im Focus: Surveying the Arctic: Tracking down carbon particles

Researchers embark on aerial campaign over Northeast Greenland

On 15 March, the AWI research aeroplane Polar 5 will depart for Greenland. Concentrating on the furthest northeast region of the island, an international team...

Im Focus: Unique Insights into the Antarctic Ice Shelf System

Data collected on ocean-ice interactions in the little-researched regions of the far south

The world’s second-largest ice shelf was the destination for a Polarstern expedition that ended in Punta Arenas, Chile on 14th March 2018. Oceanographers from...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Industry & Economy
Event News

Virtual reality conference comes to Reutlingen

19.03.2018 | Event News

Ultrafast Wireless and Chip Design at the DATE Conference in Dresden

16.03.2018 | Event News

International Tinnitus Conference of the Tinnitus Research Initiative in Regensburg

13.03.2018 | Event News

Latest News

Physicists made crystal lattice from polaritons

20.03.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Mars' oceans formed early, possibly aided by massive volcanic eruptions

20.03.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Thawing permafrost produces more methane than expected

20.03.2018 | Earth Sciences

Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>