Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Dressman - the ironing robot

26.05.2004


The main objective of the Dressman robot is to dry and press shirts. On placing a damp shirt on the ironing figure, this dummy inflates with hot air in its interior, and thus puffs the shirt up, removing creases drying the garment (it has to be previously wet and undergone a spin-dry in a washing machine).




The device has a heater box inside with a number of different resistance elements. While we are placing the shirt on it, this box stores up heat in such a way that, when the garment is positioned and we press the start button, the whole ironing dummy fills with hot air which presses and dries the shirt. Moreover, the device has an air filter which prevents dirt entering the ironing dummy.

The time for the ironing process is selected by the user. The temperature of the resistance elements is not, only the cycle time, which lasts from 4 to 15 minutes, depending on the type of cloth in the shirt being ironed (a normal cotton shirt usually takes 7-8 minutes). These times are selected on a rotary selector that is on the device itself.


When the ironing process has finished the device blows cold air for 1 minute in order to stabilise the cloth and thus prolong the effect of the ironing.

The size of the dummy adjusts perfectly to that of the garment, allowing the pressing of all kinds of shirts, including short-sleeved ones. Moreover, we can use the apparatus for all kinds of cloth, except for elastic ones, as the air pressure will make the garment.

Apart from the ironing cycles with the rotary selector, we can select a cycle where only cold air is blown simply in order to ventilate shirts and jackets.

The ironing dummy is made up of three different types of cloth, each with a distinct permeability and, thus, allowing more or less hot air to the exterior. The reason for this is that more hot air flow is needed in some areas of the shirt than in others because the cloth thickness is greater or there is a double layer of cloth (for example in the pocket zone or at the cuffs. What is more, ironing dummy can be washed in the washing machine.

One of the advantages of this device is that, while the frame of the iron can get to very high temperatures, the temperature of the dummy never gets to damage the garment. Moreover, the base of a conventional iron crushes the cloth, in such a way that it loses its pristine look after a few ironings. However, with this ironing robot system, the cloth is maintained undamaged for longer periods and the shiny patches that appear on certain materials with conventional irons.

Some numerical data:
  • The device measures 173 x 36.5 x 45 cm when in the upright position and, when folded, the height is 119 cm.
  • Its weight is 28 kg. It has wheels and a handle by which it can be easily moved from place to place.
  • It consumes about 3300 W or 2150 W. The user has the choice, by pressing a button combination, of having the machine work with 2150 W and, thus, consume less energy.

Garazi Andonegi | Basque research
Further information:
http://www.basqueresearch.com/berria_irakurri.asp?Gelaxka=1_1&Berri_Kod=490&hizk=I

More articles from Process Engineering:

nachricht Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world
08.02.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Werkstoff- und Strahltechnik IWS

nachricht New technology for mass-production of complex molded composite components
23.01.2017 | Evonik Industries AG

All articles from Process Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A Challenging European Research Project to Develop New Tiny Microscopes

The Institute of Semiconductor Technology and the Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, both members of the Laboratory for Emerging Nanometrology (LENA), at Technische Universität Braunschweig are partners in a new European research project entitled ChipScope, which aims to develop a completely new and extremely small optical microscope capable of observing the interior of living cells in real time. A consortium of 7 partners from 5 countries will tackle this issue with very ambitious objectives during a four-year research program.

To demonstrate the usefulness of this new scientific tool, at the end of the project the developed chip-sized microscope will be used to observe in real-time...

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Transport of molecular motors into cilia

28.03.2017 | Life Sciences

A novel hybrid UAV that may change the way people operate drones

28.03.2017 | Information Technology

NASA spacecraft investigate clues in radiation belts

28.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>