Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New production-ready magnesium sheet

27.11.2003


Australia’s breakthrough low-cost, thin magnesium sheet technology will be made fully production-ready during the next twelve months.



This follows the successful development by CSIRO (Commonwealth Scientific & Industrial Research Organisation) of an industrial-scale pilot plant now producing near-net-shape, or close to production thickness, low-cost magnesium sheet.

Ms Vicki Tutungi, the Head of Commercial Development at CSIRO Manufacturing & Infrastructure Technology, says, "We are aiming at an in-production technology transfer for uptake by a suitable Australian or international commercial partner".


"During proving, CSIRO is continuing discussions with a number of parties interested in the uptake of its technology."

CSIRO has now completed successful installation of a new coil line for its magnesium sheet plant, and the first coils of magnesium sheet of 60 kg each have been supplied to one of the leading manufacturers of magnesium forming products in Japan for rolling and forming trials.

"Our proving plan includes a budget of $3m, including capital acquisition and appointment of an operations manager", says Ms Tutungi.

"We are now pleased to announce the appointment of Mr Peter Kean (BAppSci) to the position."

Ms Tutungi says, "Mr Kean brings to the project extensive experience in light metal casting R&D, from research through to commercialisation of a novel casting process".

"His previous experience, including managing a metal fabrication facility, and his metallurgical qualifications, combine to make him well suited to the role.

"Mr Kean will be responsible for proving the production capability of the CSIRO Magnesium Sheet Process.

"The existing project staff will all be employed to provide production expertise and supporting R&D.

"Our strategy means potential partners will be able to tap into an immediate revenue stream as part of a CSIRO package designed to break down the barriers to the uptake of this exciting new technology", says Ms Tutungi.

"The initial enquiries CSIRO has received so far make us confident that the market is ready and waiting for commercial quantities of low-cost, thin magnesium sheet."

The twelve-month production preparation and technology prove out will take place at CSIRO’s facilities at Clayton in Melbourne, Australia.

Background Break-out Piece

Magnesium sheet is used to produce a new generation of stronger, lightweight motorcars, DVDs, printers, cameras, computers and many other consumer goods.

Previously, its commercial uptake has been hindered by the high cost and availability of magnesium sheet.

The CSIRO Twin Roll Caster aims to produce as-cast magnesium sheet in commercial quantities using patented CSIRO systems specifically developed for handling molten magnesium.

CSIRO has been developing technology to cast magnesium alloy sheet since 2000.

An exhaustive proving program has demonstrated its technology is reliable, low-cost, efficient and potentially suitable for both continuous (large) and batch (small and medium ) production, and for producing good quality magnesium alloy sheet from a large range of conventional and new magnesium alloys.

Commercial quality sheet samples from 2.3-5 mm thick have been successfully cast in standard alloys (AZ31, AZ61 AM60 and AZ91), along with new magnesium wrought alloys.

These samples have already been rolled down to 0.5-0.6 mm gauges, using a unique finish-rolling schedule developed by CSIRO specifically for cast magnesium alloy sheet.

More information:

Brad Cowley, Industry Manager, CSIRO Elaborately Transformed Metals, Email: Brad.Cowley@csiro.au

Ken Anderson, Manager Marketing Communication, CSIRO Manufacturing & Infrastructure Technology, Email: Ken.Anderson@csiro.au, 61 3 9545 2052

Ken Anderson | CSIRO
Further information:
http://www.csiro.au/index.asp?type=mediaRelease&docid=Magnesiumsheetupdate&style=mediaRelease

More articles from Process Engineering:

nachricht Jelly with memory – predicting the leveling of com-mercial paints
15.12.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Produktionstechnik und Automatisierung IPA

nachricht Fraunhofer researchers develop measuring system for ZF factory in Saarbrücken
21.11.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Zerstörungsfreie Prüfverfahren IZFP

All articles from Process Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: First-of-its-kind chemical oscillator offers new level of molecular control

DNA molecules that follow specific instructions could offer more precise molecular control of synthetic chemical systems, a discovery that opens the door for engineers to create molecular machines with new and complex behaviors.

Researchers have created chemical amplifiers and a chemical oscillator using a systematic method that has the potential to embed sophisticated circuit...

Im Focus: Long-lived storage of a photonic qubit for worldwide teleportation

MPQ scientists achieve long storage times for photonic quantum bits which break the lower bound for direct teleportation in a global quantum network.

Concerning the development of quantum memories for the realization of global quantum networks, scientists of the Quantum Dynamics Division led by Professor...

Im Focus: Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wake

Detailed calculations show water cloaks are feasible with today's technology

Researchers have developed a water cloaking concept based on electromagnetic forces that could eliminate an object's wake, greatly reducing its drag while...

Im Focus: Scientists channel graphene to understand filtration and ion transport into cells

Tiny pores at a cell's entryway act as miniature bouncers, letting in some electrically charged atoms--ions--but blocking others. Operating as exquisitely sensitive filters, these "ion channels" play a critical role in biological functions such as muscle contraction and the firing of brain cells.

To rapidly transport the right ions through the cell membrane, the tiny channels rely on a complex interplay between the ions and surrounding molecules,...

Im Focus: Towards data storage at the single molecule level

The miniaturization of the current technology of storage media is hindered by fundamental limits of quantum mechanics. A new approach consists in using so-called spin-crossover molecules as the smallest possible storage unit. Similar to normal hard drives, these special molecules can save information via their magnetic state. A research team from Kiel University has now managed to successfully place a new class of spin-crossover molecules onto a surface and to improve the molecule’s storage capacity. The storage density of conventional hard drives could therefore theoretically be increased by more than one hundred fold. The study has been published in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

Over the past few years, the building blocks of storage media have gotten ever smaller. But further miniaturization of the current technology is hindered by...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

AKL’18: The opportunities and challenges of digitalization in the laser industry

07.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Engineers program tiny robots to move, think like insects

15.12.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

One in 5 materials chemistry papers may be wrong, study suggests

15.12.2017 | Materials Sciences

New antbird species discovered in Peru by LSU ornithologists

15.12.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>