Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

From wireless to wearable technology

23.04.2003


Technology has moved beyond wireless and pocketable to wearable. Clothes and accessories can serve a wider range of purposes than we’re currently accustomed to. Wearable technology produced by a Finnish smart clothing R&D center and its partners is selling well.



The smart clothing and wearable technology concepts are based on a permanent integration of clothing and technology. Clothes can be made ‘smart’ by adding intelligent features such as information technology and by using special fibres which react in unconventional ways. Wearable technology is close to the body and enables technology to be used in situations where it’s normally not possible. For example, the user interface can be a mobile phone which is integrated into a jacket in such a way that no dialing is required and, thereby, handsfree communication is possible during an action activity such as snowboarding.

In Finland the R&D center Clothing+ was established three years ago to explore the possibilities of wearable technology, especially smart clothing. The interdisciplinary enterprise also produces and supplies components and systems of wearable technology. “Production processes of integrating hard electronics and soft textiles are quite a challenge,” notes Akseli Reho, Director of Research at Clothing+. “Our clients include large clothing and technology companies around the world.”


Clothing+ worked together with the Finnish clothing company Reima to develop a wearable handsfree phone which is worn like a small bag. The wearable phone can work as a platform for different IT-applications and can even be used in harsh weather conditions. Clothing+ has also worked with Polar Electro to bring a new heart rate monitoring system to the market. The system consists of a small transmitter unit and a textile strap which wraps closer to the chest than conventional plastic straps and, thus, enables more accurate monitoring of the heart. The strap is fastened fittingly by the transmitter unit and fits comfortably around chests of all shapes.

Smart clothing and wearable technology are already in demand and some 95 per cent of the Clothing+ products end-up abroad. “The current products are selling well. Feedback on the market has been positive,” says Reho.

Clothing+ is currently researching new product concepts based on recognised strengths of wearability and new product announcements will be made next fall. “In 2003 many other producers will also bring their solutions to the market, 2003 is the actual birth year of the wearable technology markets,” explains Reho.

Tekes has steered Finnish wearable technology innovation through its User-Oriented Information Technology Programmes, such as the already completed Survey of Intelligent Textiles and the still running Present Application of Intelligent Materials to Professional and Workwear (WEARCARE).

Mira Banerjee-Rantala | alfa
Further information:
http://www.clothingplus.fi
http://www.polar.fi
http://akseli.tekes.fi/Resource.phx/tivi/usix/en/index.htx

More articles from Process Engineering:

nachricht New technology for mass-production of complex molded composite components
23.01.2017 | Evonik Industries AG

nachricht Etching Microstructures with Lasers
25.10.2016 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Lasertechnik ILT

All articles from Process Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Scientists spin artificial silk from whey protein

X-ray study throws light on key process for production

A Swedish-German team of researchers has cleared up a key process for the artificial production of silk. With the help of the intense X-rays from DESY's...

Im Focus: Quantum optical sensor for the first time tested in space – with a laser system from Berlin

For the first time ever, a cloud of ultra-cold atoms has been successfully created in space on board of a sounding rocket. The MAIUS mission demonstrates that quantum optical sensors can be operated even in harsh environments like space – a prerequi-site for finding answers to the most challenging questions of fundamental physics and an important innovation driver for everyday applications.

According to Albert Einstein's Equivalence Principle, all bodies are accelerated at the same rate by the Earth's gravity, regardless of their properties. This...

Im Focus: Traffic jam in empty space

New success for Konstanz physicists in studying the quantum vacuum

An important step towards a completely new experimental access to quantum physics has been made at University of Konstanz. The team of scientists headed by...

Im Focus: How gut bacteria can make us ill

HZI researchers decipher infection mechanisms of Yersinia and immune responses of the host

Yersiniae cause severe intestinal infections. Studies using Yersinia pseudotuberculosis as a model organism aim to elucidate the infection mechanisms of these...

Im Focus: Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

Researchers from the University of Hamburg in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, have synthesized a new superconducting material by growing a few layers of an antiferromagnetic transition-metal chalcogenide on a bismuth-based topological insulator, both being non-superconducting materials.

While superconductivity and magnetism are generally believed to be mutually exclusive, surprisingly, in this new material, superconducting correlations...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Sustainable Water use in Agriculture in Eastern Europe and Central Asia

19.01.2017 | Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Breaking the optical bandwidth record of stable pulsed lasers

24.01.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Choreographing the microRNA-target dance

24.01.2017 | Life Sciences

Spanish scientists create a 3-D bioprinter to print human skin

24.01.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>