Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New methodology to design complete mould QFT multivariable controllers

25.10.2002


This project has been proposed in the doctoral thesis of professor Igor Egaña Santamarina of the Public University of Navarre, called “Design of complete mould QFT multivariable controllers”. Professor Mario Garcia Sanz, from the Department of Automation and Computer Science of the Public University of Navarre, has supervised the project.

Air traffic controllers and wind generator controllers

Control engineering involves the design of mathematical laws that modify the way in which industrial processes progress. That way, for example, when the way in which warming power affects the temperature of the oven is established, it is possible to determine how power must be modified so that opening and closing of the door produces a minimum effect in the inner temperature. But control engineering is present in many other industrial processes. For example, when the ABS reduces the braking of a car to avoid the blocking of wheels, or in case of an electronic circuit that tunes the exact frequency of a digital radio.



The doctoral thesis is set within the Quantitative Feedback Theory (QFT), whose development started at the end of the 50s under the supervision of professor Horowitz. Since then, some of the technical applications based on QFT are air traffic controllers of the most modern airplanes, monitoring systems of high precision satellites, sewage treatment plants or robotic. Similarly, in Navarre, Mario Garcia Sanz –director of this thesis- applies at the present this technology in the design of control systems of a wind generator of 1,5 MW for the company M. Torres Diseños Induatriales S.A.

More efficient way to reduce “coupling”

The doctoral thesis of Igor Egaña has been focused on the study of multivariable systems, that is, with multiple entries that affect multiple outputs. According to professor Egaña, the main characteristic of this kind of processes is that when measuring an error in an output and trying to reduce it acting one of the inputs, causes a failure in various outputs. That is known as the coupling effect between the links. In that sense, the thesis defends a more efficient way to reduce those interactions between links.

As a consequence of the theoretical study, it has been analysed the inclusion of some elements of the controller that usually are not considered in multivariable processes: the elements located outside the main diagonal of the controller.

To verify the validity of those theoretical results, the methodology has been applied in two different processes. On the one side, the introduction of a controller in an industrial robot of the type SCARA has proved the viability of the technical proposal. On the other side, the design of the control algorithm for the heat exchanger of a milk pasteurisation plant, which according to professor Egaña is a process with more complex characteristics from the control point of view, has strengthened the applicability of the new contribution made by this doctoral thesis.

Garazi Andonegi | alfa
Further information:
http://www.basqueresearch.com/index.asp?Gelaxka=1&hizk=I

More articles from Process Engineering:

nachricht Quick, Precise, but not Cold
17.05.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Lasertechnik ILT

nachricht A laser for divers
03.05.2017 | Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V.

All articles from Process Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Strathclyde-led research develops world's highest gain high-power laser amplifier

The world's highest gain high power laser amplifier - by many orders of magnitude - has been developed in research led at the University of Strathclyde.

The researchers demonstrated the feasibility of using plasma to amplify short laser pulses of picojoule-level energy up to 100 millijoules, which is a 'gain'...

Im Focus: Can the immune system be boosted against Staphylococcus aureus by delivery of messenger RNA?

Staphylococcus aureus is a feared pathogen (MRSA, multi-resistant S. aureus) due to frequent resistances against many antibiotics, especially in hospital infections. Researchers at the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut have identified immunological processes that prevent a successful immune response directed against the pathogenic agent. The delivery of bacterial proteins with RNA adjuvant or messenger RNA (mRNA) into immune cells allows the re-direction of the immune response towards an active defense against S. aureus. This could be of significant importance for the development of an effective vaccine. PLOS Pathogens has published these research results online on 25 May 2017.

Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a bacterium that colonizes by far more than half of the skin and the mucosa of adults, usually without causing infections....

Im Focus: A quantum walk of photons

Physicists from the University of Würzburg are capable of generating identical looking single light particles at the push of a button. Two new studies now demonstrate the potential this method holds.

The quantum computer has fuelled the imagination of scientists for decades: It is based on fundamentally different phenomena than a conventional computer....

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Reptile vocalization is surprisingly flexible

30.05.2017 | Life Sciences

EU research project DEMETER strives for innovation in enzyme production technology

30.05.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

New insights into the ancestors of all complex life

29.05.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>