Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Fingerprint recognition gets true `Fingerspitzengefühl`

02.09.2002

Will we pay using our fingerprint, or enter a building just touching a sensor? Does our mobile phone recognize our fingerprint? It is possible, as far as Dutch PhD student Asker Bazen is concerned. He has improved the verification techniques, resulting in a better result even for deformed and damaged prints. Together with a higher speed, the new methods can take away existing reserves for implementing fingerprint verification. Bazen is finishing his PhD research at the faculty of Electrical Engineering of the University of Twente, on September 18. Of all biometric methods, fingerprints are the most practical, is the conviction of Bazen: it can be done with a simple sensor that is coupled in a smart way with a database. Including the system in a mobile device like a cell phone is no problem in the near future. Iris-detection is another possibility of detection: it is extremely reliable but you need a sophisticated and fairly large camera.

Recognizing fingerprint is a complex problem for image recognition experts. The optical or capacitive sensor turns the fingerprint into a grayscale image: a black and white picture. Put the picture over a picture in the database, you would say, and you see if both print match. In practice, this turns out to be far less easy: this only works for fingerprints that are purely identical, and are saved in the database in exactly the same way. But there are numerous factors modifying the print. The policeman has a ‘flat’ print in his database, while he finds a print on a round whisky glass at the crime scene. Someone with wet or cold fingers has a slightly different fingerprint than someone with dry fingers.

Ridges and valleys Asker Bazen therefore wants to digitally re-shape the picture slightly, for an elastic fit with the picture in the database. Shrink it a little bit here, and stretch them in other places. He therefore uses recognition of the minutiae. A fingerprint consists of ridges and valleys. Where they end or split up, the minutiae are found. Every fingerprint has between twenty and fifty of them. By matching the minutiae of both prints, a new drawing grid is constructed, compensating for elastic deformation.

One of the existing problems is the processing time, especially for databases containing thousands of prints. Ideally, recognition must take place in ‘real time’. The user doesn’t want to wait or get five or six error messages before being admitted. On the other hand, an intruder must not be allowed to get in easily. Bazen mentions the black list problem, in which a small group of people is not allowed in,, e.g. football hooligan. “In that case you have a small database of people not to be admitted. You don’t want people to be able to manipulate their print in order to enter a stadium without a permit.“

In his thesis, he concludes that elastic matching is very promising, but Bazen also found a method that may be more competitive in terms of speed. It uses the main angles of the lines in the fingerprint. Four ‘cloudy’ pictures indicate the concentration of the four main angles (0, 45, 90, 135 degrees). “We always assumed that this is just a way for a first rough evaluation, but the end result is promising as well. Error percentage is going down to about 0.5 percent, with a good chance of still improving this drastically. At the same time, the speed is about 100 times higher.”

With an early version of his elastic method, Bazen in the international Fingerprint Verification Competition. He then already ended in the upper regions. His refined version has been sent to the 2002 edition of FVC. “I expect a lot of it. This technique is better than two years ago. The higher speed is a major advantage as well.”

The good old ink-and-sheets method in this way gets a full digital follow-up. The improvements Bazen, are very good for improving user acceptance. Acceptance is in fact the true bottleneck for replacing part of the PIN-passes and keys. Improved performance and speed are the only way to gain this acceptance. The sensor itself was not part of Bazen’s research. There are flexible and cheap sensors on the market, he says.

Asker Bazen MscEE defends his PhD-thesis on September 18. His promotors are prof.dr. C.H. Slump and prof.dr.-ing. O. Hermann. Comparative illustrations are available.

Press contact: University of Twente, Corporate Communication, Wiebe van der Veen, tel +31 53 4894244, e-mail w.r.vanderveen@utwente.nl

Wiebe van der Veen | AlphaGalileo

More articles from Process Engineering:

nachricht Applying electron beams to 3-D objects
23.09.2016 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Organische Elektronik, Elektronenstrahl- und Plasmatechnik FEP

nachricht New process for cell transfection in high-throughput screening
21.03.2016 | Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V.

All articles from Process Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: OLED microdisplays in data glasses for improved human-machine interaction

The Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP has been developing various applications for OLED microdisplays based on organic semiconductors. By integrating the capabilities of an image sensor directly into the microdisplay, eye movements can be recorded by the smart glasses and utilized for guidance and control functions, as one example. The new design will be debuted at Augmented World Expo Europe (AWE) in Berlin at Booth B25, October 18th – 19th.

“Augmented-reality” and “wearables” have become terms we encounter almost daily. Both can make daily life a little simpler and provide valuable assistance for...

Im Focus: Artificial Intelligence Helps in the Discovery of New Materials

With the help of artificial intelligence, chemists from the University of Basel in Switzerland have computed the characteristics of about two million crystals made up of four chemical elements. The researchers were able to identify 90 previously unknown thermodynamically stable crystals that can be regarded as new materials. They report on their findings in the scientific journal Physical Review Letters.

Elpasolite is a glassy, transparent, shiny and soft mineral with a cubic crystal structure. First discovered in El Paso County (Colorado, USA), it can also be...

Im Focus: Complex hardmetal tools out of the 3D printer

For the first time, Fraunhofer IKTS shows additively manufactured hardmetal tools at WorldPM 2016 in Hamburg. Mechanical, chemical as well as a high heat resistance and extreme hardness are required from tools that are used in mechanical and automotive engineering or in plastics and building materials industry. Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Ceramic Technologies and Systems IKTS in Dresden managed the production of complex hardmetal tools via 3D printing in a quality that are in no way inferior to conventionally produced high-performance tools.

Fraunhofer IKTS counts decades of proven expertise in the development of hardmetals. To date, reliable cutting, drilling, pressing and stamping tools made of...

Im Focus: Launch of New Industry Working Group for Process Control in Laser Material Processing

At AKL’16, the International Laser Technology Congress held in May this year, interest in the topic of process control was greater than expected. Appropriately, the event was also used to launch the Industry Working Group for Process Control in Laser Material Processing. The group provides a forum for representatives from industry and research to initiate pre-competitive projects and discuss issues such as standards, potential cost savings and feasibility.

In the age of industry 4.0, laser technology is firmly established within manufacturing. A wide variety of laser techniques – from USP ablation and additive...

Im Focus: New laser joining technologies at ‘K 2016’ trade fair

Every three years, the plastics industry gathers at K, the international trade fair for plastics and rubber in Düsseldorf. The Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT will also be attending again and presenting many innovative technologies, such as for joining plastics and metals using ultrashort pulse lasers. From October 19 to 26, you can find the Fraunhofer ILT at the joint Fraunhofer booth SC01 in Hall 7.

K is the world’s largest trade fair for the plastics and rubber industry. As in previous years, the organizers are expecting 3,000 exhibitors and more than...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Experts from industry and academia discuss the future mobile telecommunications standard 5G

23.09.2016 | Event News

ICPE in Graz for the seventh time

20.09.2016 | Event News

Using mathematical models to understand our brain

16.09.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

Chains of nanogold – forged with atomic precision

23.09.2016 | Life Sciences

New leukemia treatment offers hope

23.09.2016 | Health and Medicine

Self-assembled nanostructures hit their target

23.09.2016 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>