Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Pioneering research at Loughborough University could reduce mobile phone emissions into the body by up to 85%

12.06.2002


Loughborough University’s Centre for Mobile Communications Research (CMCR) has made some major breakthroughs in its antenna technology that could enable safer communication for all.

Using their work associated with GPS (Global Positioning System) technology, researchers have managed to reduce emissions into the body by as much as 85%. The CMCR achieved its breakthrough in antenna designs through innovative laser technology and super computing modelling techniques. This puts the University in an excellent position to be the leaders in low SAR (Specific Absorption Rate) solution providers in the UK for the Telecom industry. SAR is the parameter that measures the amount of radiation from mobile phone handsets absorbed by human tissue.

The Centre’s vital research to develop the definite low SAR mobile phone antenna has been recognised with grants from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, and it has already gained over £1 million in contracts covering many aspects of mobile communications such as GSM, 3G and BluetoothTM.



Professor Yiannis Vardaxoglou, head of the CMCR, commented, “The issue of mobile phone health is escalating rapidly and mobile handsets are now required to clearly state their SAR rating. Therefore it’s not surprising that a number of interested parties are examining ways of reducing SAR levels. For this reason we have made major investments in facilities such as super computers and a Dosimetric Assessment System which enables the radiation absorbed by a ‘phantom head’ to be accurately measured.”

One company which is outsourcing research work to the CMCR is Wellingborough-based miniature antenna manufacturer Sarantel as the company’s CEO, Barrie Foley, confirmed, “The CMCR at Loughborough University has some of the best super computer Radio Frequency modelling facilities in Europe. Design evaluations, which previously took many weeks, can now be completed in just a few days and so it makes a lot of sense for us to capitalise on their outstanding experience and facilities. This technology is real and can be delivered to the market, unlike many claims by various organisations in the past.”

Sarantel and Loughborough have previously worked together on antenna designs for GPS handsets based on the company’s PowerHelix™ technology. These antennas use helical copper tracks etched onto a ceramic puck and are finding wide acceptance with GPS handset and wireless location device manufacturers. They offer many technical benefits such as a low ‘Near Field’ which enables weak GPS satellite signals to be captured even when the equipment is in close proximity to buildings or the body of the user.

A possible by-product of the work done with Sarantel is the reduction of mobile phone antenna Near Fields in order to reduce the SAR rating of handsets. Professor Vardaxoglou explained, “If the near field could be reduced to a few millimetres with a high level of predictability, then a low SAR antenna could be a real possibility.”A selection of quality, high resolution photographs of mobile phone antenna production at Sarantel exploiting CMCR research are available to down load from the Gallery at http://www.lboro.ac.uk/departments/el/research/cmcr

Anna Seddon | alfa

More articles from Process Engineering:

nachricht New manufacturing process for SiC power devices opens market to more competition
14.09.2017 | North Carolina State University

nachricht Quick, Precise, but not Cold
17.05.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Lasertechnik ILT

All articles from Process Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Tiny lasers from a gallery of whispers

New technique promises tunable laser devices

Whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators are used to make tiny micro-lasers, sensors, switches, routers and other devices. These tiny structures rely on a...

Im Focus: Ultrafast snapshots of relaxing electrons in solids

Using ultrafast flashes of laser and x-ray radiation, scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (Garching, Germany) took snapshots of the briefest electron motion inside a solid material to date. The electron motion lasted only 750 billionths of the billionth of a second before it fainted, setting a new record of human capability to capture ultrafast processes inside solids!

When x-rays shine onto solid materials or large molecules, an electron is pushed away from its original place near the nucleus of the atom, leaving a hole...

Im Focus: Quantum Sensors Decipher Magnetic Ordering in a New Semiconducting Material

For the first time, physicists have successfully imaged spiral magnetic ordering in a multiferroic material. These materials are considered highly promising candidates for future data storage media. The researchers were able to prove their findings using unique quantum sensors that were developed at Basel University and that can analyze electromagnetic fields on the nanometer scale. The results – obtained by scientists from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics, the Swiss Nanoscience Institute, the University of Montpellier and several laboratories from University Paris-Saclay – were recently published in the journal Nature.

Multiferroics are materials that simultaneously react to electric and magnetic fields. These two properties are rarely found together, and their combined...

Im Focus: Fast, convenient & standardized: New lab innovation for automated tissue engineering & drug

MBM ScienceBridge GmbH successfully negotiated a license agreement between University Medical Center Göttingen (UMG) and the biotech company Tissue Systems Holding GmbH about commercial use of a multi-well tissue plate for automated and reliable tissue engineering & drug testing.

MBM ScienceBridge GmbH successfully negotiated a license agreement between University Medical Center Göttingen (UMG) and the biotech company Tissue Systems...

Im Focus: Silencing bacteria

HZI researchers pave the way for new agents that render hospital pathogens mute

Pathogenic bacteria are becoming resistant to common antibiotics to an ever increasing degree. One of the most difficult germs is Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

“Lasers in Composites Symposium” in Aachen – from Science to Application

19.09.2017 | Event News

I-ESA 2018 – Call for Papers

12.09.2017 | Event News

EMBO at Basel Life, a new conference on current and emerging life science research

06.09.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Molecular Force Sensors

20.09.2017 | Life Sciences

Producing electricity during flight

20.09.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Tiny lasers from a gallery of whispers

20.09.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>