Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

The Most Powerful Carbon Infrared Emitter in the World

08.12.2009
  • CIR® carbon infrared emitters heat plastics, glass or water with particularly high efficiency
  • Heraeus Noblelight now produces carbon infrared emitters in a new power class

For decades infrared emitters have been successfully used in industrial heating processes to dry coatings, form plastics and to manufacture solar cells. Since the 1990s, carbon infrared emitters have helped to save up to 30% in energy consumption in many processes.


Heraeus Photo
The most powerful carbon infrared emitter currently is 2.5 metres long and has a nominal power rating of approximately 14 kW. Copyright Heraeus Noblelight 2009

In October, the manufacture of the world’s most powerful carbon infrared emitter was brought on stream at Heraeus Noblelight in Kleinostheim, Germany. Carbon emitters can now be manufactured in lengths up to 5 metres.

To date, the most powerful carbon emitters measure 2.5 metres long with a nominal power of around 14kW, which is twice the power output which could previously be achieved by carbon emitters of such lengths. New long, high power carbon emitters operating at the effective medium wavelength, with a very fast response time will give a homogenous and even heating in one length.

The wavelength of infrared radiation has a significant influence on the process. Shortwave radiation penetrates deeply into large components and heats these rapidly and evenly. Medium wave radiation is effectively intensified at surfaces and is also very easily absorbed by water, glass and many plastics so that it is readily directly converted into heat.

Changing over to medium wave carbon infrared emitters can help to provide significant savings in energy costs. Comprehensive tests demonstrate that carbon emitters require up to 30% less energy than conventional shortwave emitters in the drying of water-based paints and lacquers. The CIR® carbon emitter has been matchless on the market for years as it combines medium wavelength radiation at high power with very fast reaction times in heating coatings, glass and plastics.

When drawing, laminating, embossing or stamping foils, infrared emitters which cover the total web width are of great advantage. Carbon infrared emitters heat the surface of plastic materials exactly at the surface, for example directly in front of the embossing slot, and homogenously over the web width.

Very long carbon emitters are also advantageous in the heating of coatings on tracks, strips and rollers.

Long Carbon Emitters Increase Safety
Conventional medium wave infrared emitters offer powers up to 60kW/m² with reaction times of the order of 2-3 minutes. In the event of an unanticipated stoppage of the conveyor belt, conventional medium wave emitters need to be swivelled away or screened, both actions taking some time, in order to prevent damage to the web. Carbon emitters have power ratings up to 150 kW/m², they have reaction times of the order of seconds and can be almost immediately switched off in the event of belt stoppage.
Heraeus Noblelight offers the complete palette of infrared from NIR near infrared to CIR medium wave carbon infrared, carries out trials with materials to be heated and advises on the selection of the optimum emitter for specific processes.

Heraeus has more than 40 years experience of infrared emitters, both for end-users and for large OEMs. It carries out practical tests and trials using customers’ own materials in its in-house Application Centres, to establish the best process solutions.

Heraeus Noblelight GmbH with its headquarters in Hanau and with subsidiaries in the USA, Great Britain, France, China, Australia and Puerto Rico, is one of the technology and market leaders in the production of speciality light sources. In 2008, Heraeus Noblelight had an annual turnover of 92.5 Million € and employed 735 people worldwide. The organisation develops, manufactures and markets infrared and ultraviolet emitters for applications in industrial manufacture, environmental protection, medicine and cosmetics, research, development and analytical laboratories.

Heraeus, the precious metals and technology group headquartered in Hanau, Germany, is a global, private company with over 155 years of tradition. Our businesses include precious metals, sensors, dental and medical products, quartz glass, and specialty lighting sources. With product revenues approaching € 3 billion and precious metal trading revenues of € 13 billion, as well as over 13,000 employees in more than 110 companies worldwide, Heraeus holds a leading position in its global markets.

Further Information:

Readers:
Heraeus Noblelight GmbH
Reinhard-Heraeus-Ring 7
D-63801 Kleinostheim
phone +49 6181/35-8545, fax +49 6181/35-16 8545
E-Mail hng-infrared@heraeus.com
Press:
Dr. Marie-Luise Bopp
Heraeus Noblelight GmbH,
phone +49 6181/35-8547, fax +49 6181/35-16 8547
E-Mail marie-luise.bopp@heraeus.com

Dr. Marie-Luise Bopp | Heraeus Noblelight GmbH
Further information:
http://www.heraeus-noblelight.com

More articles from Process Engineering:

nachricht New manufacturing process for SiC power devices opens market to more competition
14.09.2017 | North Carolina State University

nachricht Quick, Precise, but not Cold
17.05.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Lasertechnik ILT

All articles from Process Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: The pyrenoid is a carbon-fixing liquid droplet

Plants and algae use the enzyme Rubisco to fix carbon dioxide, removing it from the atmosphere and converting it into biomass. Algae have figured out a way to increase the efficiency of carbon fixation. They gather most of their Rubisco into a ball-shaped microcompartment called the pyrenoid, which they flood with a high local concentration of carbon dioxide. A team of scientists at Princeton University, the Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford University and the Max Plank Institute of Biochemistry have unravelled the mysteries of how the pyrenoid is assembled. These insights can help to engineer crops that remove more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere while producing more food.

A warming planet

Im Focus: Highly precise wiring in the Cerebral Cortex

Our brains house extremely complex neuronal circuits, whose detailed structures are still largely unknown. This is especially true for the so-called cerebral cortex of mammals, where among other things vision, thoughts or spatial orientation are being computed. Here the rules by which nerve cells are connected to each other are only partly understood. A team of scientists around Moritz Helmstaedter at the Frankfiurt Max Planck Institute for Brain Research and Helene Schmidt (Humboldt University in Berlin) have now discovered a surprisingly precise nerve cell connectivity pattern in the part of the cerebral cortex that is responsible for orienting the individual animal or human in space.

The researchers report online in Nature (Schmidt et al., 2017. Axonal synapse sorting in medial entorhinal cortex, DOI: 10.1038/nature24005) that synapses in...

Im Focus: Tiny lasers from a gallery of whispers

New technique promises tunable laser devices

Whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators are used to make tiny micro-lasers, sensors, switches, routers and other devices. These tiny structures rely on a...

Im Focus: Ultrafast snapshots of relaxing electrons in solids

Using ultrafast flashes of laser and x-ray radiation, scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (Garching, Germany) took snapshots of the briefest electron motion inside a solid material to date. The electron motion lasted only 750 billionths of the billionth of a second before it fainted, setting a new record of human capability to capture ultrafast processes inside solids!

When x-rays shine onto solid materials or large molecules, an electron is pushed away from its original place near the nucleus of the atom, leaving a hole...

Im Focus: Quantum Sensors Decipher Magnetic Ordering in a New Semiconducting Material

For the first time, physicists have successfully imaged spiral magnetic ordering in a multiferroic material. These materials are considered highly promising candidates for future data storage media. The researchers were able to prove their findings using unique quantum sensors that were developed at Basel University and that can analyze electromagnetic fields on the nanometer scale. The results – obtained by scientists from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics, the Swiss Nanoscience Institute, the University of Montpellier and several laboratories from University Paris-Saclay – were recently published in the journal Nature.

Multiferroics are materials that simultaneously react to electric and magnetic fields. These two properties are rarely found together, and their combined...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

“Lasers in Composites Symposium” in Aachen – from Science to Application

19.09.2017 | Event News

I-ESA 2018 – Call for Papers

12.09.2017 | Event News

EMBO at Basel Life, a new conference on current and emerging life science research

06.09.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Rainbow colors reveal cell history: Uncovering β-cell heterogeneity

22.09.2017 | Life Sciences

Penn first in world to treat patient with new radiation technology

22.09.2017 | Medical Engineering

Calculating quietness

22.09.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>