Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

The LZH develops a fiber amplifier for measuring gravitational waves in space

20.06.2014

When the European Space Agency (ESA) sends the “3rd Large Mission” into space in 2034, its goal will be to detect gravitational waves. Scientists at the Laser Zentrum Hannover e. V. (LZH) have now begun to develop fiber amplifiers for the required lasers.

The task of the Single-Frequency Laser Group of the LZH almost sounds trivial: The fiber amplifiers developed by this group should be used to post-amplify a special laser with a low output. However, the general framework of the project eLISA makes laser development a real challenge: The choice of optical components that can be used is highly limited.


In the project eLISA, a mother satellite sends laser beams to two daughter satellites. From the returning beams, gravitational waves should be calculated.

Illustration: AEI/MM/exozet

Challenge: Simple and fit for use in space

Since the availability of resources in space is very limited, the amplifier in planning must work very efficiently”, says the head of the group Dr. Peter Weßels, when addressing the task. “At the same time, the setup must be kept as simple as possible, so the laser can be qualified for use in space.”

... more about:
»LZH »Laser »Space »fiber »gravitational »movements »satellite »waves

Detecting miniscule movements over enormous distances

Despite the high limitations, the laser must provide high performance. The laser beam must travel over a distance of around one million kilometers between the mother satellite and both daughter satellites. Once it arrives, the beam is regenerated and sent back the same distance.

The differences in the phase of the returning light can be used to conclude distance changes in space on the subatomic scale, the gravitational waves.

The scientists working with Dr. Peter Weßels want to develop a so-called „Engineering Qualification Modell“ within the next three years. Such a model is not yet completely ready for use in space, but the setup and design is quite similar to the later model.

Apart from the LZH, the Fundação Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal, and the Czech Space Research Centre s.r.o., Czech Republic, are working on the development of the laser system for the eLISA mission. The developmental project is headed by the Portuguese company LusoSpace Lda.

Weitere Informationen:

https://www.elisascience.org/ - eLISA website
https://www.elisascience.org/multimedia/image/elisa-spacecraft-two-laser-arms - illustration source

Lena Bennefeld | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

Further reports about: LZH Laser Space fiber gravitational movements satellite waves

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht Pulses of electrons manipulate nanomagnets and store information
21.07.2017 | American Institute of Physics

nachricht Vortex photons from electrons in circular motion
21.07.2017 | National Institutes of Natural Sciences

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

Im Focus: On the way to a biological alternative

A bacterial enzyme enables reactions that open up alternatives to key industrial chemical processes

The research team of Prof. Dr. Oliver Einsle at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Biochemistry has long been exploring the functioning of nitrogenase....

Im Focus: The 1 trillion tonne iceberg

Larsen C Ice Shelf rift finally breaks through

A one trillion tonne iceberg - one of the biggest ever recorded -- has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, after a rift in the ice,...

Im Focus: Laser-cooled ions contribute to better understanding of friction

Physics supports biology: Researchers from PTB have developed a model system to investigate friction phenomena with atomic precision

Friction: what you want from car brakes, otherwise rather a nuisance. In any case, it is useful to know as precisely as possible how friction phenomena arise –...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA looks to solar eclipse to help understand Earth's energy system

21.07.2017 | Earth Sciences

Stanford researchers develop a new type of soft, growing robot

21.07.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Vortex photons from electrons in circular motion

21.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>