Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Return of the comet: 96P spotted by ESA, NASA satellites

06.11.2017

The ESA (European Space Agency) and NASA mission SOHO -- short for Solar and Heliospheric Observatory -- got a visit from an old friend this week when comet 96P entered its field of view on Oct. 25, 2017. The comet entered the lower right corner of SOHO's view, and skirted up and around the right edge before leaving on Oct. 30. SOHO also spotted comet 96P in 1996, 2002, 2007 and 2012, making it the spacecraft's most frequent cometary visitor.

At the same time, comet 96P passed through a second NASA mission's view: STEREO -- short for Solar and Terrestrial Relations Observatory -- also watched the comet between Oct. 26-28, from the opposite side of Earth's orbit.


The comet entered the bottom of STEREO's view and crossed it diagonally before leaving on Oct. 28. Most of the corona has been suppressed in order to bring out the comet, leaving only the dynamic flow of the solar wind.

Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/STEREO/Bill Thompson/Joy Ng

It is extremely rare for comets to be seen simultaneously from two different locations in space, and these are the most comprehensive parallel observations of comet 96P yet. Scientists are eager to use these combined observations to learn more about the comet's composition, as well as its interaction with the solar wind, the constant flow of charged particles from the Sun.

Both missions gathered polarization measurements of the comet; these are measurements of sunlight in which all the light waves become oriented the same way after passing through a medium -- in this case, particles in the tail of the comet. By pooling the polarization data together, scientists can extract details on the particles that the light passed through.

"Polarization is a strong function of the viewing geometry, and getting multiple measurements at the same time could potentially give useful information about the composition and size distribution of the tail particles," said William Thompson, STEREO chief observer at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.

Comet 96P -- also known as comet Machholz, for amateur astronomer Dan Machholz's 1986 discovery of the comet -- completes an orbit around the Sun every 5.24 years. It makes its closest approach to the Sun at a toasty 11 million miles -- a very close distance for a comet.

When comet 96P appeared in SOHO's view in 2012, amateur astronomers studying the SOHO data discovered two tiny comet fragments some distance ahead of the main body, signaling the comet was actively changing. This time around they have detected a third fragment -- another breadcrumb in the trail that indicates the comet is still evolving.

Scientists find comet 96P interesting because it has an unusual composition and is the parent of a large, diverse family, referring to a group of comets sharing a common orbit and originating from a much larger parent comet that over millennia, broke up into smaller fragments.

Comet 96P is the parent of two separate comet groups, both of which were discovered by citizen scientists studying SOHO data, as well as a number of Earth-crossing meteor streams. By studying the comet's ongoing evolution, scientists can learn more about the nature and origins of this complex family.

Lina Tran | EurekAlert!

Further reports about: ESA Goddard Space Flight Center NASA NASA satellites SOHO polarization

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht Crystals in a pink X-ray beam
06.11.2017 | Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY

nachricht Researchers Develop Data Bus for Quantum Computer
06.11.2017 | Universität Innsbruck

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Researchers Develop Data Bus for Quantum Computer

The quantum world is fragile; error correction codes are needed to protect the information stored in a quantum object from the deteriorating effects of noise. Quantum physicists in Innsbruck have developed a protocol to pass quantum information between differently encoded building blocks of a future quantum computer, such as processors and memories. Scientists may use this protocol in the future to build a data bus for quantum computers. The researchers have published their work in the journal Nature Communications.

Future quantum computers will be able to solve problems where conventional computers fail today. We are still far away from any large-scale implementation,...

Im Focus: Wrinkles give heat a jolt in pillared graphene

Rice University researchers test 3-D carbon nanostructures' thermal transport abilities

Pillared graphene would transfer heat better if the theoretical material had a few asymmetric junctions that caused wrinkles, according to Rice University...

Im Focus: Support Free with “TwoCure” – Innovation in Resin-Based 3D Printing

The Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT and Rapid Shape GmbH are working together to further develop resin-based 3D printing. The new “TwoCure” process requires no support structures and is significantly more efficient and productive than conventional 3D printing techniques for plastic components. Experts from Fraunhofer ILT will be presenting the state-funded joint development that makes use of the interaction of light and cold in forming the components at formnext 2017 from November 14 to 17 in Frankfurt am Main.

Much like stereolithography, one of the best-known processes for printing 3D plastic components works using photolithographic light exposure that causes liquid...

Im Focus: Researchers develop chip-scale optical abacus

A team of researchers led by Prof. Wolfram Pernice from the Institute of Physics at Münster University has developed a miniature abacus on a microchip which calculates using light signals. With it they are paving the way to the development of new types of computer in which, as in the human brain, the computing and storage functions are combined in one element.

Researchers at the universities of Münster, Exeter and Oxford have developed a miniature “abacus” which can be used for calculating with light signals. With it...

Im Focus: Lightwave controlled nanoscale electron acceleration sets the pace

Extremely short electron bunches are key to many new applications including ultrafast electron microscopy and table-top free-electron lasers. A german team of physicists from Rostock University, the Max Born Institute in Berlin, the Ludwig-Maxmilians-Universität Munich, and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics in Garching has now shown how electrons can be accelerated in an extreme and well-controlled way with laser light, while crossing a silver particle of just a few nanometers.

Of particular importance for potential applications is the ability to manipulate the acceleration process, known as a swing-by maneuver from space travel, with...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

#Berlin5GWeek: The right network for Industry 4.0

30.10.2017 | Event News

3rd Symposium on Driving Simulation

23.10.2017 | Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Medica 2017: New software enables early diagnosis of arteriosclerosis

06.11.2017 | Trade Fair News

Crystals in a pink X-ray beam

06.11.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

The principle of optical illusions technically imitated

06.11.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>