Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


Most powerful group of microscopes in the world

Seven new super-microscopes and a specially designed building will give scientists at DTU unique opportunities to design new materials. Among the areas that will benefit are the environment, manufacturing, energy and transport.

The most powerful group of microscopes in the world was inaugurated friday by ship-owner Mr Mærsk Mc-Kinney Møller. DTU’s Center for Electron Nanoscopy (DTU CEN) owes its creation to a large donation from the A.P. Møller and Chastine Mc-Kinney Møller Foundation for General Purposes.

“It is unique to be able both to build an ambitious centre and to equip it with the absolute best in electron microscopy technology at the same time. This raises Danish experimental facilities for research into materials and nanotechnology to world class. It will have a major influence on nanoscience all over the world,” says Lars Pallesen, Rector of DTU.

One of the total of seven new microscopes is the almost four-metre-high ‘Environmental Transmission Electron Microscope’, developed in association with DTU by world-leading microscope manufacturer FEI Company. It is the most powerful of its type in the world.

“With this newly developed microscope, we will be able to see atomic-level details, in the future also in 3D. The magnification is so great that a human hair would appear as broard as a soccer field.

“We expect to be able to observe with a resolution of 0.07 nanometres – half the size of a carbon atom,” says Dr Rafal E. Dunin-Borkowski, Director of DTU CEN.

According to Dr Dunin-Borkowski, this will be a giant step forward, for example in the field of materials research, with scientists being able to see what happens to individual atoms when they make changes in materials and give them new properties.

“That applies to aluminium and magnesium alloys, building materials, and more. These are new materials able to change the course of society in areas such as communication, energy, transport and electronics,” adds Dr Dunin-Borkowski.

Special building to protect delicate apparatus
DTU’s microscopes are special because they will be the first commercial microscopes allowing 100 per cent compensation for errors in the electromagnetic lenses.

The lenses cannot be made error-free, and therefore the great challenge was error-correction. In collaboration with FEI Company, this has been successfully achieved. Measurements already show that the combination of the new microscopes and the new building has created the best microscopy facility in the world.

“As the global leader in ultra-high resolution and innovative solutions for electron microscopy, we have been working closely with our partners at DTU," says Don Kania, CEO & President of FEI Company. "Our ability to collaborate with customers, delivering the most advanced electron microscopes coupled with proven applications expertise, has demonstrated itself with great success in the realization of DTU CEN”.

The large donation from the Foundation made possible not only the creation of DTU CEN, but also the construction of a very special building to protect the microscopes from vibration, fluctuations in temperature, and electromagnetic noise.

Even the smallest vibration would blur the image when working with very high resolutions. The temperature within the building must not vary by more than a tenth of a degree, otherwise it could cause the microscope itself to expand or contract. And electromagnetic fields would interfere with the microscopes’ technology.

Michael Strangholt | alfa
Further information:

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht OU-led team discovers rare, newborn tri-star system using ALMA
27.10.2016 | University of Oklahoma

nachricht First results of NSTX-U research operations
26.10.2016 | DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Etching Microstructures with Lasers

Ultrafast lasers have introduced new possibilities in engraving ultrafine structures, and scientists are now also investigating how to use them to etch microstructures into thin glass. There are possible applications in analytics (lab on a chip) and especially in electronics and the consumer sector, where great interest has been shown.

This new method was born of a surprising phenomenon: irradiating glass in a particular way with an ultrafast laser has the effect of making the glass up to a...

Im Focus: Light-driven atomic rotations excite magnetic waves

Terahertz excitation of selected crystal vibrations leads to an effective magnetic field that drives coherent spin motion

Controlling functional properties by light is one of the grand goals in modern condensed matter physics and materials science. A new study now demonstrates how...

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Scientists develop a semiconductor nanocomposite material that moves in response to light

In a paper in Scientific Reports, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute describes a novel light-activated phenomenon that could become the basis for applications as diverse as microscopic robotic grippers and more efficient solar cells.

A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a revolutionary, light-activated semiconductor nanocomposite material that can be used...

Im Focus: Diamonds aren't forever: Sandia, Harvard team create first quantum computer bridge

By forcefully embedding two silicon atoms in a diamond matrix, Sandia researchers have demonstrated for the first time on a single chip all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together.

"People have already built small quantum computers," says Sandia researcher Ryan Camacho. "Maybe the first useful one won't be a single giant quantum computer...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

Agricultural Trade Developments and Potentials in Central Asia and the South Caucasus

14.10.2016 | Event News

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016 | Event News

Latest News

How nanoscience will improve our health and lives in the coming years

27.10.2016 | Materials Sciences

OU-led team discovers rare, newborn tri-star system using ALMA

27.10.2016 | Physics and Astronomy

'Neighbor maps' reveal the genome's 3-D shape

27.10.2016 | Life Sciences

More VideoLinks >>>