Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Looking further into the Universe

22.04.2002


How can the Universe be studied? There is no way to affect a research object of infinite dimensions. It means that the research can only be carried out via observations, employing all methods available. To this end scientists have been inventing more and more powerful telescopes which would enable them to examine closely remote spots of the Universe and to hear a `voice` of the sky at all available bandwidths. The scientists are planning to dispatch to space a cryogen submillimetric telescope called `Submillimetron`, which is supposed to play the role of a supersensitive `ear`. Hopefully, this device will provide astronomers with the first map of the Universe radiation at a 3 THz waveband. It is worth noting that the wavelength of this bandwidth makes tenth parts of a millimetre, it means that the bandwidth is at the boundary between infrared rays and microwave frequency. The stars are almost invisible at submillimetric waves and do not prevent the scientists from seeing remote Galaxies.



The Galaxies are so far away, that the time period required for their radiation to reach the Earth is close to the age of the Universe. By now the scientists have found only a few such remote Galaxies with the help of optic telescopes, while `Submillimetron` will find about a million of such objects, this invention will reveal an almost unexplored world. A team of the experienced scientists from Sweden, Finland and Russia are developing the unique device. The Russian party is represented by Academician N. Kardashev, who is heading the research activities of the project, the following entities being involved in the project implementation: Centre of Astronomy and Space, (Physical Institute of the Academy of Sciences), Institute of Physical Problems (Russian Academy of Sciences), Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics (Russian Academy of Sciences) as well as Space Rockets Corporation `Energy`, which is in charge of the telescope delivery to the space station.

It is impossible to perceive THz-radiation on the Earth - it is overlapped by the infrared radiation. That is why the telescope is to be transported to space `to listen to the stars` without disturbances, although even in space the telescope will have to be screened -from the solar and earth radiation in this case.


The sensor of the new telescope is the so-called energy absorber. It is a small metal `wire`, or film, to be more precise, 5 microns long, 0.2 microns wide and less than 0.02 microns thick. This wire is a core of the antenna. The `wire` is made of a non-superconducting metal, the ends of the wire being connected to superconducting electrodes (made of aluminium or niobium).

At an extremely low temperature (0.1 ?) the galactic noise, focused on the sensor of the antenna, heats up the conduction electrons in a non-superconducting metal. To find and to record this tiny change of the electric current, the specialists of the Physical Faculty, Moscow State University are producing a special chip, containing an amplifier and a commutator. Due to it, a minor change of the electric current can be transformed into the voltage change.

Despite the seeming simplicity of the physical idea, it is not easily implemented. The scientists are still facing a lot of problems as regards to the efficiency of heating the electrons at this radiation bandwidth. However, the researchers are confident that these issues can be solved. And pretty soon, in about five years, we shall be able to hear the `voice` of the sky at a new bandwidth. With the help of this new device the astronomers and physicists will be able to answer the questions they are not even thinking about yet. Probably, they will hear the voice of an extraterrestrial civilisation. Or perhaps, they will discover something absolutely new, for instance, a type of substance previously unknown. Anyway, the researchers will acquire new opportunities to study the Universe.

Olga Maksimenko | alphagalileo

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht Graphene and quantum dots put in motion a CMOS-integrated camera that can see the invisible
30.05.2017 | ICFO-The Institute of Photonic Sciences

nachricht New Method of Characterizing Graphene
30.05.2017 | Universität Basel

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: New Method of Characterizing Graphene

Scientists have developed a new method of characterizing graphene’s properties without applying disruptive electrical contacts, allowing them to investigate both the resistance and quantum capacitance of graphene and other two-dimensional materials. Researchers from the Swiss Nanoscience Institute and the University of Basel’s Department of Physics reported their findings in the journal Physical Review Applied.

Graphene consists of a single layer of carbon atoms. It is transparent, harder than diamond and stronger than steel, yet flexible, and a significantly better...

Im Focus: Strathclyde-led research develops world's highest gain high-power laser amplifier

The world's highest gain high power laser amplifier - by many orders of magnitude - has been developed in research led at the University of Strathclyde.

The researchers demonstrated the feasibility of using plasma to amplify short laser pulses of picojoule-level energy up to 100 millijoules, which is a 'gain'...

Im Focus: Can the immune system be boosted against Staphylococcus aureus by delivery of messenger RNA?

Staphylococcus aureus is a feared pathogen (MRSA, multi-resistant S. aureus) due to frequent resistances against many antibiotics, especially in hospital infections. Researchers at the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut have identified immunological processes that prevent a successful immune response directed against the pathogenic agent. The delivery of bacterial proteins with RNA adjuvant or messenger RNA (mRNA) into immune cells allows the re-direction of the immune response towards an active defense against S. aureus. This could be of significant importance for the development of an effective vaccine. PLOS Pathogens has published these research results online on 25 May 2017.

Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a bacterium that colonizes by far more than half of the skin and the mucosa of adults, usually without causing infections....

Im Focus: A quantum walk of photons

Physicists from the University of Würzburg are capable of generating identical looking single light particles at the push of a button. Two new studies now demonstrate the potential this method holds.

The quantum computer has fuelled the imagination of scientists for decades: It is based on fundamentally different phenomena than a conventional computer....

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

3D printer inks from the woods

30.05.2017 | Life Sciences

How circadian clocks communicate with each other

30.05.2017 | Life Sciences

Graphene and quantum dots put in motion a CMOS-integrated camera that can see the invisible

30.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>