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PhysMath Central Takes Off with a Big Bang

02.10.2007
Momentum builds with launch of PMC Physics B, first published research in PMC Physics A

PhysMath Central, BioMed Central’s open access publishing platform for the fields of physics, mathematics and computer science, today announced that PMC Physics A, the first PhysMath Central journal, has published its first research articles. The articles included a groundbreaking study that could change the way physicists understand dark matter.

One of the first articles published in PMC Physics A shares the results of a study conducted by Nikolaos Mavromatos of King’s College London and his colleagues Athanasios Lahanas and Dimitri Nanopoulos, which found that the amount of dark matter left over from the early universe may be less than previously believed. The full research paper, along with others, can be read at www.physmathcentral.com/pmcphysa.

PhysMath Central also announces that its second journal, PMC Physics B will be edited jointly by Prof. Peter Hatton, Professor of Physics, Durham University, and Prof. Steve Buckman of Australian National University. The new journal will focus on condensed matter and atomic, molecular and optical (AMO) physics.

“This is exciting news for us as we continue our aim of bringing new open access journals to all areas of physics,” said Chris Leonard, associate publisher, PhysMath Central. “We are very proud that researchers of the calibre of Professors Hatton and Buckman have agreed to be editors of PMC Physics B and look forward to publishing our first papers in these most exciting areas of research.”

Professor Peter Hatton is head of the condensed matter research group at the University of Durham and has published more than 100 papers in neutron scattering, orbital physics, resonant soft x-ray scattering, strongly correlated electron systems, superconductors and x-ray scattering. In addition to his research, Prof. Hatton also chairman of the I16 (Magnetism and Materials) beamline working party for DIAMOND, a new synchrotron facility based in the UK - as well as being chairman of the CCLRC Soft X-ray Diffractometer Project Management Committee.

Professor Stephen Buckman is Research Director of the Australian Research Council's Centre of Excellence for Antimatter-Matter Studies, focusing on absolute scattering measurements of low energy, electron-driven processes in atoms and molecules, scattering from excited atoms and molecules, and the elucidation of resonance excitation mechanisms in electron collisions. He has been involved in atomic and molecular physics research since completing his PhD at Flinders University, Adelaide in 1979.

Speaking of his new role, Buckman said, "I am delighted to be working with PhysMath Central and to be one of the editors for this ambitious journal. As well as providing a open access option for scientists to publish their very best work on condensed matter or AMO physics, we are particularly excited to cover emerging areas which were traditionally at the interface of one or the other discipline."

Launched to meet the increasing need for open access journals from major research institutes (such as CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research) and other funding organizations and government bodies, PhysMath Central seeks to make research in physics, mathematics and computer science more widely available and increase access to this research to all institutes and individuals, free of subscription charges.

For more information on PhysMath Central, please contact Chris Leonard at chris.leonard@physmathcentral.com or visit the website http://www.physmathcentral.com and associated weblog http://www.physmathcentral.com/blog/.

About BioMed Central

BioMed Central (http://www.biomedcentral.com) is an independent online publishing house committed to providing immediate access without charge to the peer-reviewed biological and medical research it publishes. This commitment is based on the view that open access to research is essential to the rapid and efficient communication of science.

About PhysMath Central

PhysMath Central (http://www.physmathcentral.com) is an independent publishing platform operated by BioMed Central committed to providing immediate open access to peer-reviewed physics and mathematics research.

Robert Brumfield
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Robert Brumfield | Fusion Public Relations
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