Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Galileo gets the go-ahead

26.03.2002


Europe’s satellite navigation system, called Galileo, is planned to become operational in 2008
® ESA


The European Space Agency warmly welcomes the decision taken today by the European Union Transport Ministers, meeting in Brussels.

Galileo has now been given the official go-ahead but for ESA that simply means that work on Galileo can continue! ESA teams have already been working for a number of years on satellite navigation systems, including the development of critical technologies such as atomic clocks and signal generators.

Developed by ESA in collaboration with the European Union and co-funded by the two organisations on a 50-50 basis, Galileo is a complete civil system, designed to be operational from 2008 and to provide the world in general and Europeans in particular with an accurate, secure and certified satellite positioning system.



There are many potential applications in road, rail, air and maritime traffic control, synchronisation of data transmission between banks, etc., and the economic implications for the coming 15 years are tremendous, with an estimated 4.6 return on investment and the creation of more than 100 000 jobs.

Satellite navigation undoubtedly represents a real technological revolution comparable, some say, to the invention of the timepiece!

Once, we needed to know the time. Now, we need to know the time and also where we are.
So Galileo will be of vital importance to ordinary men and women both in Europe and throughout the world because at present everything depends on the GPS set up and controlled by the US military. Galileo will be in commercial competition with the GPS but will also complement it and provide redundancy. The result will be a continuity of service that could not be achieved by a single system.

The go-ahead for Galileo is particularly important for European industry, which will now be able to develop the advanced technologies required not only for the purposes of the satellite network and its ground support system but also for the numerous applications associated with it.

ESA was able to start work on applications several years ago, thanks to the European Global Navigation Overlay Service EGNOS, which refines current GPS data and foreshadows the services Galileo will provide.

"Galileo marks an important step for Space Europe", said ESA Director General Antonio Rodotá, "because it is the first time a project has been conducted jointly by the European Space Agency and the European Union". It is also the first time the European Union has set up a joint undertaking. The partnership, comprising the European Commission and ESA, will have overall responsibility for the development and validation phase and the preparations for deployment and operations.

It is thus a great step forward for space activities and for Europe, a step that will bring benefits to people all over the world.

The Galileo system will consist of 30 satellites (27 in operation and 3 in reserve), deployed in three circular Medium Earth Orbits at an altitude of 23 616 km and an inclination of 56° to the equator. This will provide excellent coverage of the planet. Two Galileo Control Centres will be set up in Europe to monitor the operation of the satellites and manage the navigation system.

| ESA

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht Engineering team images tiny quasicrystals as they form
18.08.2017 | Cornell University

nachricht Astrophysicists explain the mysterious behavior of cosmic rays
18.08.2017 | Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Fizzy soda water could be key to clean manufacture of flat wonder material: Graphene

Whether you call it effervescent, fizzy, or sparkling, carbonated water is making a comeback as a beverage. Aside from quenching thirst, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have discovered a new use for these "bubbly" concoctions that will have major impact on the manufacturer of the world's thinnest, flattest, and one most useful materials -- graphene.

As graphene's popularity grows as an advanced "wonder" material, the speed and quality at which it can be manufactured will be paramount. With that in mind,...

Im Focus: Exotic quantum states made from light: Physicists create optical “wells” for a super-photon

Physicists at the University of Bonn have managed to create optical hollows and more complex patterns into which the light of a Bose-Einstein condensate flows. The creation of such highly low-loss structures for light is a prerequisite for complex light circuits, such as for quantum information processing for a new generation of computers. The researchers are now presenting their results in the journal Nature Photonics.

Light particles (photons) occur as tiny, indivisible portions. Many thousands of these light portions can be merged to form a single super-photon if they are...

Im Focus: Circular RNA linked to brain function

For the first time, scientists have shown that circular RNA is linked to brain function. When a RNA molecule called Cdr1as was deleted from the genome of mice, the animals had problems filtering out unnecessary information – like patients suffering from neuropsychiatric disorders.

While hundreds of circular RNAs (circRNAs) are abundant in mammalian brains, one big question has remained unanswered: What are they actually good for? In the...

Im Focus: RAVAN CubeSat measures Earth's outgoing energy

An experimental small satellite has successfully collected and delivered data on a key measurement for predicting changes in Earth's climate.

The Radiometer Assessment using Vertically Aligned Nanotubes (RAVAN) CubeSat was launched into low-Earth orbit on Nov. 11, 2016, in order to test new...

Im Focus: Scientists shine new light on the “other high temperature superconductor”

A study led by scientists of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg presents evidence of the coexistence of superconductivity and “charge-density-waves” in compounds of the poorly-studied family of bismuthates. This observation opens up new perspectives for a deeper understanding of the phenomenon of high-temperature superconductivity, a topic which is at the core of condensed matter research since more than 30 years. The paper by Nicoletti et al has been published in the PNAS.

Since the beginning of the 20th century, superconductivity had been observed in some metals at temperatures only a few degrees above the absolute zero (minus...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Call for Papers – ICNFT 2018, 5th International Conference on New Forming Technology

16.08.2017 | Event News

Sustainability is the business model of tomorrow

04.08.2017 | Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Nagoya physicists resolve long-standing mystery of structure-less transition

21.08.2017 | Materials Sciences

Chronic stress induces fatal organ dysfunctions via a new neural circuit

21.08.2017 | Health and Medicine

Scientists from the MSU studied new liquid-crystalline photochrom

21.08.2017 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>