Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

STS-116 crew completes European tour

19.04.2007
“I never ever thought there would be such enormous interest as there has been," said ESA astronaut Christer Fuglesang, commenting on the European post-flight tour he has just completed together with the rest of the STS-116 Space Shuttle crew. In just nine days the crew worked through an intensive schedule of presentations and visits in five European countries.

With crewmember and Swedish ESA astronaut Christer Fuglesang as their host, the crew passed through Stockholm and Gothenburg in Sweden, as well as the Danish and Norwegian cities of Copenhagen and Oslo. In each city they talked to packed out audiences in museums, parliament, Royal palaces and universities, about last December's Shuttle mission to the International Space Station (ISS).

Christer Fuglesang was proud to be able to show the rest of his crew around Europe. "I was surprised about how strong the attention has been growing in Sweden, Denmark and Norway," he said. "Even three months later during this post-flight tour we experience that the fascination is still there. I hope the interest will continue.”

Nearing the end of their European stay, the crew also took a couple of days to visit two of ESA's sites in Germany and The Netherlands. "I think it is fitting that in our last two days we've visited the heart of ESA by going to the European Astronaut Centre and now here at ESTEC," said STS-116 Commander Mark Polansky, as he introduced his crew to the audience at ESA's research and technology centre, ESTEC, in Noordwijk, the Netherlands – the venue for their final presentation before flying home to Houston, in the United States.

"We also get to see the thing that we like to see – the real space hardware that is going to go into space!" Polansky added, referring to their viewing of the Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV), Europe's re-supply spaceship for the ISS, currently in the ESTEC Test Centre ahead of shipping to its French Guiana launch site.

After Daniel Sacotte, ESA's Director of Human Spaceflight, Microgravity and Exploration, had welcomed the crew to ESTEC, they presented a summary of their 13-day mission and answered questions from the audience.

Reflecting on how well the crew got on together during their mission, Polansky explained that it comes down to some mutual respect. "As a crew you have to respect each other and work and play well together. It's pretty much common courtesy – as if you are on a very long camping trip together, but in space you can't walk too far away."

By all accounts Fuglesang's crewmates were also impressed with the welcome they were given in Europe. "It was very refreshing seeing the reception that Christer gets, particularly in Sweden and Norway," said STS-116 Mission Specialist Nicholas Patrick. "It shows me how much interest there is in spaceflight. That is something that we almost forget in America where it has become more routine."

For Mark Polansky, the tour has also been an eye-opener. "You get to see the international component of what we do," he said. "We've seen the excitement throughout Europe. We realise that we are doing incredible work, not just in the United States, but in cooperation with our international partners."

Rosita Suenson | alfa
Further information:
http://www.esa.int/esaHS/SEMAFYLJC0F_astronauts_0.html

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht NASA's SDO sees partial eclipse in space
29.05.2017 | NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

nachricht Strathclyde-led research develops world's highest gain high-power laser amplifier
29.05.2017 | University of Strathclyde

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Strathclyde-led research develops world's highest gain high-power laser amplifier

The world's highest gain high power laser amplifier - by many orders of magnitude - has been developed in research led at the University of Strathclyde.

The researchers demonstrated the feasibility of using plasma to amplify short laser pulses of picojoule-level energy up to 100 millijoules, which is a 'gain'...

Im Focus: Can the immune system be boosted against Staphylococcus aureus by delivery of messenger RNA?

Staphylococcus aureus is a feared pathogen (MRSA, multi-resistant S. aureus) due to frequent resistances against many antibiotics, especially in hospital infections. Researchers at the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut have identified immunological processes that prevent a successful immune response directed against the pathogenic agent. The delivery of bacterial proteins with RNA adjuvant or messenger RNA (mRNA) into immune cells allows the re-direction of the immune response towards an active defense against S. aureus. This could be of significant importance for the development of an effective vaccine. PLOS Pathogens has published these research results online on 25 May 2017.

Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a bacterium that colonizes by far more than half of the skin and the mucosa of adults, usually without causing infections....

Im Focus: A quantum walk of photons

Physicists from the University of Würzburg are capable of generating identical looking single light particles at the push of a button. Two new studies now demonstrate the potential this method holds.

The quantum computer has fuelled the imagination of scientists for decades: It is based on fundamentally different phenomena than a conventional computer....

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

New insights into the ancestors of all complex life

29.05.2017 | Earth Sciences

New photocatalyst speeds up the conversion of carbon dioxide into chemical resources

29.05.2017 | Life Sciences

NASA's SDO sees partial eclipse in space

29.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>