Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Fusion conditions - Particle simulation studies of divertor plasmas

25.02.2002


"Nuclear fusion" is the melting of light nuclei into heavier ones, a process that according to the laws of physics releases enormous amounts of energy. For the past 50 years many scientists have sought ways of harnessing this fusion reaction under controlled reactor conditions as a safe, clean and practically inexhaustible source of energy. Siegbert Kuhn and his team at the Institute of Theoretical Physics at Innsbruck University are making a major contribution to these efforts and positioning Austrian nuclear fusion research at the forefront of international activities in this field by carrying out particle simulation studies of divertor plasmas sponsored by the Austrian Science Fund (FWF) and in cooperation with international research groups.



In order to obtain an adequate number of nuclear fusion reactions for practical energy production, the particles involved must be made to collide with sufficient frequency and sufficient energy. In principle, this can be most readily achieved in an extremely hot hydrogen gas (approx. 100 million degrees) at appropriate density. At these temperatures the gas is fully "ionised", meaning that the gas molecules, which are electrically neutral under normal conditions, are split into positively charged nuclei ("ions") and negatively charged "electrons". "Such a gas is called a `plasma` and the plasma state is commonly referred to as the `fourth state of matter`", Kuhn goes on explaining that plasma is the stuff that stars are made of: "Only imagine it: 99.99 % of all matter in the universe is in the plasma state!". Hot plasma is confined in a ring-shaped vessel (torus) by a magnetic field of suitable structure. The most promising configuration to date is termed "tokamak". The next ambitious aim of international fusion research is the construction of the "International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)", which will be the first reactor to work with a plasma largely heated by the fusion reaction itself and which will come very close to the concept of a future commercial fusion reactor in terms of plasma physics.

In a tokamak a distinction is made between the hot "core plasma", in which the energy-producing nuclear fusion reactions take place, and the cooler "edge plasma" through which the high-energy plasma particles diffusing from the core plasma are passed to the baffle plates of the divertor. "Since there are strict technical limits to the amounts of energy to which divertor plates can be subjected, questions relating to the contact between the plasma and the divertor wall count among the most important scientific and technical challenges of modern fusion research", explains Kuhn. He has obtained important results for a better understanding of the divertor plasma in his project. Existing models and simulation programmes, for example, have been greatly improved and the strong influence of secondary and fast electrons on the edge layer was clearly shown and quantified. Kuhn: "We were also able to make a major contribution to understanding the forming and effects of fast particles which occur during the heating of the tokamak plasma through wave injection and which can seriously damage the divertor plates. In a next step, our results can be directly used for modelling and optimising existing and planned tokamaks."

Monika Scheifinger | alphagalileo

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht Pulses of electrons manipulate nanomagnets and store information
21.07.2017 | American Institute of Physics

nachricht Vortex photons from electrons in circular motion
21.07.2017 | National Institutes of Natural Sciences

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

Im Focus: On the way to a biological alternative

A bacterial enzyme enables reactions that open up alternatives to key industrial chemical processes

The research team of Prof. Dr. Oliver Einsle at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Biochemistry has long been exploring the functioning of nitrogenase....

Im Focus: The 1 trillion tonne iceberg

Larsen C Ice Shelf rift finally breaks through

A one trillion tonne iceberg - one of the biggest ever recorded -- has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, after a rift in the ice,...

Im Focus: Laser-cooled ions contribute to better understanding of friction

Physics supports biology: Researchers from PTB have developed a model system to investigate friction phenomena with atomic precision

Friction: what you want from car brakes, otherwise rather a nuisance. In any case, it is useful to know as precisely as possible how friction phenomena arise –...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA looks to solar eclipse to help understand Earth's energy system

21.07.2017 | Earth Sciences

Stanford researchers develop a new type of soft, growing robot

21.07.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Vortex photons from electrons in circular motion

21.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>