Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Down with physics: Giant CMS magnet goes underground at CERN

02.03.2007
Scientists of the US CMS collaboration joined colleagues around the world in announcing today (February 28) that the heaviest piece of the Compact Muon Solenoid particle detector has begun the momentous journey into its experimental cavern 100 meters underground. A huge gantry crane is slowly lowering the CMS detector's preassembled central section into place in the Large Hadron Collider accelerator at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland.

At 1,950 metric tons, the section, which contains the detector's solenoid magnet, weighs as much as five jumbo jets and is 16 meters tall, 17 meters wide and 13 meters long. Its descent is expected to take about 10 hours.

"This is a challenging feat of engineering, as there are just 20 centimeters of leeway between the detector and the walls of the shaft," said CERN physicist Austin Ball, technical coordinator of CMS. "The detector is suspended by four massive cables, each with 55 strands, and attached to a step-by-step hydraulic jacking system, with sophisticated monitoring and control to ensure the object does not sway or tilt."

Of the CMS collaboration's approximately 1500 physicists, about one-third are U.S. scientists. The Department of Energy's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory is the host laboratory for US CMS, and U.S. scientists have designed, built and delivered to CERN several key elements of the CMS detector. Currently, U.S. contributions to CMS are more than 98 percent complete. A U.S. team from Fermilab recently carried out a precision mapping of the magnetic field of the CMS solenoid magnet that is being lowered today. By observing the curvature of the paths of charged particles in the magnetic field, physicists will calculate the energy of particles flying out from billions upon billions of proton-proton collisions that will occur inside the detector.

"We are proud of our contribution to the extraordinary international scientific endeavor now taking shape at the LHC," said Associate Director for High Energy Physics at DOE's Office of Science Dr. Robin Staffin. "We applaud the engineering tour de force of today's CMS milestone at CERN. Each step forward at the LHC experiments and the accelerator brings us closer to the start of scientific operations and to breakthroughs in our understanding of the physics of the universe."

Experimenters have already lowered the first seven of 15 pieces of the CMS detector, with the first piece arriving in the experimental cavern on November 30, 2006. The giant section descending today marks the halfway point in the lowering process, with the last piece scheduled to make its descent in summer 2007. Particle detectors are typically assembled underground, where the accelerator tunnel is located. CMS has broken with tradition by starting assembly before completion of the underground cavern, taking advantage of a spacious surface assembly hall to preassemble and pretest the detector's myriad components and systems.

"This is an impressive milestone in the complex installation of the CMS particle detector," said Dr. Moishe Pripstein, Program Director at the National Science Foundation. "It augurs well for being ready for first beam collisions at the LHC. We are delighted that scientists from U.S. universities and from Fermilab are making substantial technical contributions to this grand international collaboration and look forward to exciting results in the next several years."

Physicists are preparing the CMS detector and its sister detector, ATLAS, to take data at CERN's Large Hadron Collider, where scientists predict that they will make fundamental discoveries about the universe, using very-high-energy proton collisions. Beyond revealing a new world of unknown particles, the LHC experiments could explain why those particles exist and behave as they do. They could discover the origins of mass, shed light on dark matter, uncover hidden symmetries of the universe, and possibly find extra dimensions of space.

Judy Jackson | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.fnal.gov

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht Comet or asteroid? Hubble discovers that a unique object is a binary
21.09.2017 | NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

nachricht First users at European XFEL
21.09.2017 | European XFEL GmbH

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Highly precise wiring in the Cerebral Cortex

Our brains house extremely complex neuronal circuits, whose detailed structures are still largely unknown. This is especially true for the so-called cerebral cortex of mammals, where among other things vision, thoughts or spatial orientation are being computed. Here the rules by which nerve cells are connected to each other are only partly understood. A team of scientists around Moritz Helmstaedter at the Frankfiurt Max Planck Institute for Brain Research and Helene Schmidt (Humboldt University in Berlin) have now discovered a surprisingly precise nerve cell connectivity pattern in the part of the cerebral cortex that is responsible for orienting the individual animal or human in space.

The researchers report online in Nature (Schmidt et al., 2017. Axonal synapse sorting in medial entorhinal cortex, DOI: 10.1038/nature24005) that synapses in...

Im Focus: Tiny lasers from a gallery of whispers

New technique promises tunable laser devices

Whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators are used to make tiny micro-lasers, sensors, switches, routers and other devices. These tiny structures rely on a...

Im Focus: Ultrafast snapshots of relaxing electrons in solids

Using ultrafast flashes of laser and x-ray radiation, scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (Garching, Germany) took snapshots of the briefest electron motion inside a solid material to date. The electron motion lasted only 750 billionths of the billionth of a second before it fainted, setting a new record of human capability to capture ultrafast processes inside solids!

When x-rays shine onto solid materials or large molecules, an electron is pushed away from its original place near the nucleus of the atom, leaving a hole...

Im Focus: Quantum Sensors Decipher Magnetic Ordering in a New Semiconducting Material

For the first time, physicists have successfully imaged spiral magnetic ordering in a multiferroic material. These materials are considered highly promising candidates for future data storage media. The researchers were able to prove their findings using unique quantum sensors that were developed at Basel University and that can analyze electromagnetic fields on the nanometer scale. The results – obtained by scientists from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics, the Swiss Nanoscience Institute, the University of Montpellier and several laboratories from University Paris-Saclay – were recently published in the journal Nature.

Multiferroics are materials that simultaneously react to electric and magnetic fields. These two properties are rarely found together, and their combined...

Im Focus: Fast, convenient & standardized: New lab innovation for automated tissue engineering & drug

MBM ScienceBridge GmbH successfully negotiated a license agreement between University Medical Center Göttingen (UMG) and the biotech company Tissue Systems Holding GmbH about commercial use of a multi-well tissue plate for automated and reliable tissue engineering & drug testing.

MBM ScienceBridge GmbH successfully negotiated a license agreement between University Medical Center Göttingen (UMG) and the biotech company Tissue Systems...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

“Lasers in Composites Symposium” in Aachen – from Science to Application

19.09.2017 | Event News

I-ESA 2018 – Call for Papers

12.09.2017 | Event News

EMBO at Basel Life, a new conference on current and emerging life science research

06.09.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Comet or asteroid? Hubble discovers that a unique object is a binary

21.09.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Cnidarians remotely control bacteria

21.09.2017 | Life Sciences

Monitoring the heart's mitochondria to predict cardiac arrest?

21.09.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>