Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

ESA’s first Swedish astronaut to fly to the ISS

01.12.2006
ESA astronaut Christer Fuglesang is about to become the first Swedish and the first Nordic astronaut in space. During the night of 7/8 December, he will board NASA’s Shuttle Discovery as Mission Specialist on flight STS-116.
With his six crewmates, he will fly to the International Space Station on a mission to add a new section to its truss structure and to reroute electrical power supply and thermal control from its new set of solar arrays and radiators.

Discovery will lift off from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida at 03:36 CET (02:36 UTC) on 8 December. Docking with the ISS is scheduled for 00:00 CET on 10 December (23:00 UTC, 9 December).

Once onboard the Space Station, Christer Fuglesang will meet up with fellow ESA astronaut Thomas Reiter from Germany, who has been a permanent crew member since 6 July. This will be the first time that two ESA astronauts fly together on the same ISS mission. Both will return to Earth onboard Discovery at the end of its 12-day assignment.

During his stay onboard, Christer Fuglesang will perform two Extravehicular Activities (EVAs), of the three scheduled on this mission.

Dubbed 'Celsius' after the famous Swedish scientist and astronomer Anders Celsius (1701-1744), Christer Fuglesang’s mission will also involve conducting a number of European experiments in the areas of human physiology and radiation dosimetry, as well as a series of experiments in those same areas geared to educational purposes.

With the European Celsius mission, ESA confirms its role as a major contributor to the ISS programme and assembly effort. Set to follow in Christer Fuglesang’s footsteps, a number of other ESA astronauts are already training for future ISS assembly missions. Next to go will be Paolo Nespoli of Italy on STS-120 carrying the European-built Node 2 module in September 2007, and Hans Schlegel of Germany on STS-122 on a mission devoted to installing ESA’s Columbus laboratory in October 2007.

ESA’s dedicated mission website provides news and background information, images, vodcasts and more, in both English and Swedish: http://www.esa.int/celsius.

As the STS-116 launch is scheduled for what will be the middle of the night in Europe, ESA does not plan to arrange media events at its operations centres. Live video feeds provided by NASA will be accessible on the internet through ESA’s Celsius mission website.

ESA-TV will provide a rebroadcast of NASA-TV coverage from the start-of-mission commentary at 21:30 CET through to hatch closure at approx. 01:30 CET on 8 December, and then again of the final countdown/launch. ESA-TV will also provide a launch-day highlights summary at 05:30 CET on 8 December.

ESA-TV will also provide daily mission coverage in the form of rebroadcasts of NASA-TV flight day highlights at 09:00 CET, plus ESA-TV spacewalk highlights of the two EVAs involving Fuglesang, in time for breakfast news.

All satellite details and schedules will be posted on http://television.esa.int on 4 December.

Live video feeds provided by NASA will be accessible on the internet via ESA’s Celsius mission website .

To celebrate the flight of its first astronaut from Sweden, ESA is jointly organising a special event with the Swedish National Space Board and the city of Stockholm at the 'Kulturhuset'. From 7 to 20 December, 'SpaceCamp Stockholm' will host exhibits, lectures, workshops, film shows and many other activities geared to promoting space activities and applications. As part of this, a local live event for the general public and media representatives is being arranged for the launch itself.

Rosita Suenson | alfa
Further information:
http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Celsius/SEMZ6DD4VUE_0.html

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht Comet or asteroid? Hubble discovers that a unique object is a binary
21.09.2017 | NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

nachricht First users at European XFEL
21.09.2017 | European XFEL GmbH

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Highly precise wiring in the Cerebral Cortex

Our brains house extremely complex neuronal circuits, whose detailed structures are still largely unknown. This is especially true for the so-called cerebral cortex of mammals, where among other things vision, thoughts or spatial orientation are being computed. Here the rules by which nerve cells are connected to each other are only partly understood. A team of scientists around Moritz Helmstaedter at the Frankfiurt Max Planck Institute for Brain Research and Helene Schmidt (Humboldt University in Berlin) have now discovered a surprisingly precise nerve cell connectivity pattern in the part of the cerebral cortex that is responsible for orienting the individual animal or human in space.

The researchers report online in Nature (Schmidt et al., 2017. Axonal synapse sorting in medial entorhinal cortex, DOI: 10.1038/nature24005) that synapses in...

Im Focus: Tiny lasers from a gallery of whispers

New technique promises tunable laser devices

Whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators are used to make tiny micro-lasers, sensors, switches, routers and other devices. These tiny structures rely on a...

Im Focus: Ultrafast snapshots of relaxing electrons in solids

Using ultrafast flashes of laser and x-ray radiation, scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (Garching, Germany) took snapshots of the briefest electron motion inside a solid material to date. The electron motion lasted only 750 billionths of the billionth of a second before it fainted, setting a new record of human capability to capture ultrafast processes inside solids!

When x-rays shine onto solid materials or large molecules, an electron is pushed away from its original place near the nucleus of the atom, leaving a hole...

Im Focus: Quantum Sensors Decipher Magnetic Ordering in a New Semiconducting Material

For the first time, physicists have successfully imaged spiral magnetic ordering in a multiferroic material. These materials are considered highly promising candidates for future data storage media. The researchers were able to prove their findings using unique quantum sensors that were developed at Basel University and that can analyze electromagnetic fields on the nanometer scale. The results – obtained by scientists from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics, the Swiss Nanoscience Institute, the University of Montpellier and several laboratories from University Paris-Saclay – were recently published in the journal Nature.

Multiferroics are materials that simultaneously react to electric and magnetic fields. These two properties are rarely found together, and their combined...

Im Focus: Fast, convenient & standardized: New lab innovation for automated tissue engineering & drug

MBM ScienceBridge GmbH successfully negotiated a license agreement between University Medical Center Göttingen (UMG) and the biotech company Tissue Systems Holding GmbH about commercial use of a multi-well tissue plate for automated and reliable tissue engineering & drug testing.

MBM ScienceBridge GmbH successfully negotiated a license agreement between University Medical Center Göttingen (UMG) and the biotech company Tissue Systems...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

“Lasers in Composites Symposium” in Aachen – from Science to Application

19.09.2017 | Event News

I-ESA 2018 – Call for Papers

12.09.2017 | Event News

EMBO at Basel Life, a new conference on current and emerging life science research

06.09.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Comet or asteroid? Hubble discovers that a unique object is a binary

21.09.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Cnidarians remotely control bacteria

21.09.2017 | Life Sciences

Monitoring the heart's mitochondria to predict cardiac arrest?

21.09.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>