Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Long-lasting but dim brethren of cosmic flashes

31.08.2006
Unusual Gamma-Ray Burst Studied in Detail

Astronomers, using ESO’s Very Large Telescope, have for the first time made the link between an X-ray flash and a supernova. Such flashes are the little siblings of gamma-ray bursts (GRB) and this discovery suggests the existence of a population of events less luminous than ‘classical’ GRBs, but possibly much more numerous.

“This extends the GRB–supernova connection to X-ray flashes and fainter supernovae, implying a common origin”, said Elena Pian (INAF, Italy), lead-author of one of the four papers related to this event appearing in the 31 August issue of Nature.

The event began on 18 February 2006: the NASA/PPARC/ASI Swift satellite detected an unusual gamma-ray burst, about 25 times closer and 100 times longer than the typical gamma-ray burst. GRBs release in a few seconds more energy than that of the Sun during its entire lifetime of more than 10,000 million years. The GRBs are thus the most powerful events since the Big Bang known in the Universe.

The explosion, called GRB 060218 after the date it was discovered, originated in a star-forming galaxy about 440 million light-years away toward the constellation Aries. This is the second-closest gamma-ray burst ever detected. Moreover, the burst of gamma rays lasted for nearly 2,000 seconds; most bursts last a few milliseconds to tens of seconds. The explosion was surprisingly dim, however.

A team of astronomers has found hints of a budding supernova. Using, among others, ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile, the scientists have watched the afterglow of this burst grow brighter in optical light. This brightening, along with other telltale spectral characteristics in the light, strongly suggests that a supernova was unfolding. Within days, the supernova became apparent.

The observations with the VLT started on 21 February 2006, just three days after the discovery. Spectroscopy was then performed nearly daily for seventeen days, providing the astronomers with a large data set to document this new class of events.

The group led by Elena Pian indeed confirmed that the event was tied to a supernova called SN 2006aj a few days later. Remarkable details about the chemical composition of the star debris continue to be analysed.

The newly discovered supernova is dimmer than hypernovae associated with normal long gamma-ray bursts by about a factor of two, but it is still a factor of 2–3 more luminous than regular core-collapse supernovae.

All together, these facts point to a substantial diversity between supernovae associated with GRBs and supernovae associated with X-ray flashes. This diversity may be related to the masses of the exploding stars.

Whereas gamma-ray bursts probably mark the birth of a black hole, X-ray flashes appear to signal the type of star explosion that leaves behind a neutron star. Based on the VLT data, a team led by Paolo Mazzali of the Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics in Garching, Germany, postulate that the 18 February event might have led to a highly magnetic type of neutron star called a magnetar.

Mazzali and his team find indeed that the star that exploded had an initial mass of ‘only’ 20 times the mass of the Sun. This is smaller, by about a factor two at least, than those estimated for the typical GRB–supernovae.

“The properties of GRB 060218 suggest the existence of a population of events less luminous than ‘classical’ GRBs, but possibly much more numerous”, said Mazzali. “Indeed, these events may be the most abundant form of X- or gamma-ray bursts in the Universe, but instrumental limits allow us to detect them only locally”.

The astronomers find that the number of such events could be about 100 times more numerous than typical gamma-ray bursts.

Henri Boffin | alfa
Further information:
http://www.eso.org/outreach/press-rel/pr-2006/pr-33-06.html

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht Shape matters when light meets atom
05.12.2016 | Centre for Quantum Technologies at the National University of Singapore

nachricht Climate cycles may explain how running water carved Mars' surface features
02.12.2016 | Penn State

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Shape matters when light meets atom

Mapping the interaction of a single atom with a single photon may inform design of quantum devices

Have you ever wondered how you see the world? Vision is about photons of light, which are packets of energy, interacting with the atoms or molecules in what...

Im Focus: Novel silicon etching technique crafts 3-D gradient refractive index micro-optics

A multi-institutional research collaboration has created a novel approach for fabricating three-dimensional micro-optics through the shape-defined formation of porous silicon (PSi), with broad impacts in integrated optoelectronics, imaging, and photovoltaics.

Working with colleagues at Stanford and The Dow Chemical Company, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign fabricated 3-D birefringent...

Im Focus: Quantum Particles Form Droplets

In experiments with magnetic atoms conducted at extremely low temperatures, scientists have demonstrated a unique phase of matter: The atoms form a new type of quantum liquid or quantum droplet state. These so called quantum droplets may preserve their form in absence of external confinement because of quantum effects. The joint team of experimental physicists from Innsbruck and theoretical physicists from Hannover report on their findings in the journal Physical Review X.

“Our Quantum droplets are in the gas phase but they still drop like a rock,” explains experimental physicist Francesca Ferlaino when talking about the...

Im Focus: MADMAX: Max Planck Institute for Physics takes up axion research

The Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPP) is opening up a new research field. A workshop from November 21 - 22, 2016 will mark the start of activities for an innovative axion experiment. Axions are still only purely hypothetical particles. Their detection could solve two fundamental problems in particle physics: What dark matter consists of and why it has not yet been possible to directly observe a CP violation for the strong interaction.

The “MADMAX” project is the MPP’s commitment to axion research. Axions are so far only a theoretical prediction and are difficult to detect: on the one hand,...

Im Focus: Molecules change shape when wet

Broadband rotational spectroscopy unravels structural reshaping of isolated molecules in the gas phase to accommodate water

In two recent publications in the Journal of Chemical Physics and in the Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, researchers around Melanie Schnell from the Max...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ICTM Conference 2017: Production technology for turbomachine manufacturing of the future

16.11.2016 | Event News

Innovation Day Laser Technology – Laser Additive Manufacturing

01.11.2016 | Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

Speed data for the brain’s navigation system

06.12.2016 | Health and Medicine

What happens in the cell nucleus after fertilization

06.12.2016 | Life Sciences

IHP presents the fastest silicon-based transistor in the world

05.12.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>