Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Smart Spring - Moscow Scientist Invents Unusual Water Purification Filter

04.11.2005


Pores never become clogged in this filter – because there are no pores at all. The filter is designed in a different way.



The device invented by V.B. Krapukhin, Ph. D. (Engineering) was shown for the first time at the recent “Chemistry-2005” exhibition in Moscow where constantly crowded near the exhibition booth. The most heard comment was “simple like everything ingenious”.

The water purification filter looks as follows:


There is a tank containing troubled, evidently dirty water, and another tank – containing clean, filtered water. Between them, there is a transparent either plastic or glass cylinder, inside which there a sort of stick covered by dense dark grey thin coating. Naturally there are also communication pipes, pumps, manometers. Suddenly, after some manipulation by the author demonstrating his invention, purified water stops running into the tank, grey coating gets troubled, unattractive content of the cartridge runs out backwards – into the tank with dirty water. A a shining spring is revealed inside, the zest of invention, its kernel.

How does this work?

In the operating position spring coils are pressed together tightly. Water gets into the cartridge under pressure and, having gone through the filter-spring, runs out already purified from dirt. Particulate pollutants larger than a micron remain in the cartridge. They are unable to squeeze through the spring coils. This is it, as simple as that.

“Normally, after several filtration-regeneration cycles were performed, pores of known filter mediums, such as cardboards, fabrics and others got irreversibly plugged up with solid phase particles." explains V.B. That is why in the long run filter elements have to be extracted and replaced with new ones. Filter materials turned into waste, which, in case of toxic or radioactive contamination, had to be reclaim or buried. New filters had to be bought, consuming time and money which is not superfluous.

Apparently, the new filter element is free from such disadvantages – due to the lack of source of disadvantages, i.e. removable filters. Simple flushing within several minutes puts the spring back to operating condition. The filter design is quite multi-purpose – this method is suitable for purification of various liquid and gas currents. The number of filtration-regeneration cycles may be practically endless.

However, the device is not universal. For example, it does not provide for chemical purification of water. It performs mechanical purification from impurity substances, their size exceeding a micron. So, the device will clean water from silt, for example, but certainly not from salts of hardness. If soluble compounds should be filtered off, this has to be done additionally. However, this is how it is commonly done. But there will be no need to change filters endlessly, or to live in constant fear that the current of dirt would clog the pores up, due to that the process would go wrong – unfortunately, this happens quite often with ususal filters. This is absolutely impossible in case of Krapukhin’s filters, which can be cleaned and returned back to operating condition in no time. They are indeed cheap but good.

The filter element of the device has been developed by V.B. Krapukhin and his colleagues at the Institute of Physical Chemistry(Russian Academy of Sciences). The scientist work at the laboratory of physicochemical methods for radioactive elements localization.

Sergey Komarov | alfa
Further information:
http://www.informnauka.ru

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht Scientists propose synestia, a new type of planetary object
23.05.2017 | University of California - Davis

nachricht Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence
23.05.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

Im Focus: Using graphene to create quantum bits

In the race to produce a quantum computer, a number of projects are seeking a way to create quantum bits -- or qubits -- that are stable, meaning they are not much affected by changes in their environment. This normally needs highly nonlinear non-dissipative elements capable of functioning at very low temperatures.

In pursuit of this goal, researchers at EPFL's Laboratory of Photonics and Quantum Measurements LPQM (STI/SB), have investigated a nonlinear graphene-based...

Im Focus: Bacteria harness the lotus effect to protect themselves

Biofilms: Researchers find the causes of water-repelling properties

Dental plaque and the viscous brown slime in drainpipes are two familiar examples of bacterial biofilms. Removing such bacterial depositions from surfaces is...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

Innovation 4.0: Shaping a humane fourth industrial revolution

17.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Scientists propose synestia, a new type of planetary object

23.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Zap! Graphene is bad news for bacteria

23.05.2017 | Life Sciences

Medical gamma-ray camera is now palm-sized

23.05.2017 | Medical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>