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Smart Spring - Moscow Scientist Invents Unusual Water Purification Filter


Pores never become clogged in this filter – because there are no pores at all. The filter is designed in a different way.

The device invented by V.B. Krapukhin, Ph. D. (Engineering) was shown for the first time at the recent “Chemistry-2005” exhibition in Moscow where constantly crowded near the exhibition booth. The most heard comment was “simple like everything ingenious”.

The water purification filter looks as follows:

There is a tank containing troubled, evidently dirty water, and another tank – containing clean, filtered water. Between them, there is a transparent either plastic or glass cylinder, inside which there a sort of stick covered by dense dark grey thin coating. Naturally there are also communication pipes, pumps, manometers. Suddenly, after some manipulation by the author demonstrating his invention, purified water stops running into the tank, grey coating gets troubled, unattractive content of the cartridge runs out backwards – into the tank with dirty water. A a shining spring is revealed inside, the zest of invention, its kernel.

How does this work?

In the operating position spring coils are pressed together tightly. Water gets into the cartridge under pressure and, having gone through the filter-spring, runs out already purified from dirt. Particulate pollutants larger than a micron remain in the cartridge. They are unable to squeeze through the spring coils. This is it, as simple as that.

“Normally, after several filtration-regeneration cycles were performed, pores of known filter mediums, such as cardboards, fabrics and others got irreversibly plugged up with solid phase particles." explains V.B. That is why in the long run filter elements have to be extracted and replaced with new ones. Filter materials turned into waste, which, in case of toxic or radioactive contamination, had to be reclaim or buried. New filters had to be bought, consuming time and money which is not superfluous.

Apparently, the new filter element is free from such disadvantages – due to the lack of source of disadvantages, i.e. removable filters. Simple flushing within several minutes puts the spring back to operating condition. The filter design is quite multi-purpose – this method is suitable for purification of various liquid and gas currents. The number of filtration-regeneration cycles may be practically endless.

However, the device is not universal. For example, it does not provide for chemical purification of water. It performs mechanical purification from impurity substances, their size exceeding a micron. So, the device will clean water from silt, for example, but certainly not from salts of hardness. If soluble compounds should be filtered off, this has to be done additionally. However, this is how it is commonly done. But there will be no need to change filters endlessly, or to live in constant fear that the current of dirt would clog the pores up, due to that the process would go wrong – unfortunately, this happens quite often with ususal filters. This is absolutely impossible in case of Krapukhin’s filters, which can be cleaned and returned back to operating condition in no time. They are indeed cheap but good.

The filter element of the device has been developed by V.B. Krapukhin and his colleagues at the Institute of Physical Chemistry(Russian Academy of Sciences). The scientist work at the laboratory of physicochemical methods for radioactive elements localization.

Sergey Komarov | alfa
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