Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Dense high performance low alloy PM steels

14.10.2005


Miren Sarasola, Bachelor of Physics Science and researcher of the Materials Department at CEIT, has developed dense high performance low alloy PM steels by liquid phase sintering. The Thesis title is : "Development of dense high performance low alloy PM steels by liquid phase sintering".



The master alloy concept as a mean for obtaining high density low alloyed PM steels was revisited. In a first instance, several master alloys previously reported in the literature, were reproduced in order to carry out experimental sintering trials with the aim of understanding the behaviour of these master alloys, mixed in predetermined proportions, with a selection of Fe-based powders. As a secondary objective the accuracy of theoretical predictions based on ThermoCalc calculations was compared against the reported experimental data. A conjunction of this information with additional experiments tending to determine the diffusion paths and rates of a diversity of elements in multicomponent Fe-based systems was used for identifying adequate alloy additions supported by a computer aided alloy design approach.

On these bases, several mater alloys have been specifically designed, under metallurgic and thermodinamic criterion, to provide the formation of wetting liquid phases at low temperature and also, attractive mechanical properties of the steels. The as-sintered density and properties of the alloys is determined by the amount and type of master alloy used, total carbon content, the sintering temperature and time. The performance of the master alloys during sintering is shown for several commercially available Fe-based powders. The microstructural development of the steels is determined, both, by the chemical composition of the Fe-based powder and the chemical reactions taking place between the Fe and the master alloy particles during high temperature sintering. The influence of alloying and the sintering conditions on the final microstructure, density and mechanical properties is also discussed.


The thesis has been given the Schunk Materials Prize 2005 because the work in the field of sintered metal technology has distinguished itself by its scientific significance.

Irati Kortabitarte | alfa
Further information:
http://www.basqueresearch.com

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht Scientists propose synestia, a new type of planetary object
23.05.2017 | University of California - Davis

nachricht Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence
23.05.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

Im Focus: Using graphene to create quantum bits

In the race to produce a quantum computer, a number of projects are seeking a way to create quantum bits -- or qubits -- that are stable, meaning they are not much affected by changes in their environment. This normally needs highly nonlinear non-dissipative elements capable of functioning at very low temperatures.

In pursuit of this goal, researchers at EPFL's Laboratory of Photonics and Quantum Measurements LPQM (STI/SB), have investigated a nonlinear graphene-based...

Im Focus: Bacteria harness the lotus effect to protect themselves

Biofilms: Researchers find the causes of water-repelling properties

Dental plaque and the viscous brown slime in drainpipes are two familiar examples of bacterial biofilms. Removing such bacterial depositions from surfaces is...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

Innovation 4.0: Shaping a humane fourth industrial revolution

17.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Scientists propose synestia, a new type of planetary object

23.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Zap! Graphene is bad news for bacteria

23.05.2017 | Life Sciences

Medical gamma-ray camera is now palm-sized

23.05.2017 | Medical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>