Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Winner named in EU competition on architecture and design of building for world’s largest telescope

11.10.2005


Within the framework of the EU’s Sixth Framework Program, preliminary studies are underway to build a land-based telescope that will be by far the largest ever, thus offering entirely new potential for detailed observations. For one thing, researchers hope to be able to see so far into space, and thereby so far back in time, that they will be able to understand the creation of the universe and discover whether it is possible that there is life on other planets.



Recently a winner was picked in the competition for innovative design and architecture for the building that will house the telescope. A proposal submitted by Lund University in Sweden took first place honors in competition with seven other pan-European suggestions. A Spanish team’s design came in second.

“This is highly gratifying. Since this project is so unique, it requires entirely new solutions in terms of construction, which has made our work both stimulating and challenging,” explains Göran Sandberg, professor of structural mechanics at Lund Institute of Technology and project director for the Lund team’s construction proposal.


The telescope and its roughly 200-meter high building are characterized by advanced engineering solutions in adaptive optics, control technology, and computer algorithms, for example. The primary mirror of the planned telescope will be at least 50 meters in diameter. The corresponding measure of today’s largest land-based telescope, the Keck Telescope in Hawaii, is less than ten meters. The size of the mirror is crucial to the sharpness and resolution of the image.

“With the new telescope, the collection of light and focus will be ten thousand times better than today, which opens entirely new potential for studying galaxies, for instance,” explains Arne Ardeberg, who for several years, together with Torben Andersen at the Department of Astronomy, has been promoting the idea of constructing a telescope of the sort that the EU is now planning to build. They have played a major role in shaping the Lund team’s overall plan, which sets up the guidelines together with another pan-European proposal, Owl.

Arne Ardeberg explains that land-based telescopes have a great advantage over space-based telescopes, which, owing to high costs, have to be made considerably smaller and are more difficult to maintain. On the other hand, space telescopes can capture light waves that do not penetrate the atmosphere of the earth, so the two types complement each other, as he sees it.

In other words, Lund University is already a key player in the EU telescope project, and this role has now been confirmed once again. The telescope is planned to be located in northern Chile or in the Canary Islands and is estimated to be ready for use in a little more than ten years.

Kristina Lindgärde | alfa
Further information:
http://www.astro.lu.se/euro50
http://www.vr.se

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht New manifestation of magnetic monopoles discovered
08.12.2017 | Institute of Science and Technology Austria

nachricht NASA's SuperTIGER balloon flies again to study heavy cosmic particles
07.12.2017 | NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Towards data storage at the single molecule level

The miniaturization of the current technology of storage media is hindered by fundamental limits of quantum mechanics. A new approach consists in using so-called spin-crossover molecules as the smallest possible storage unit. Similar to normal hard drives, these special molecules can save information via their magnetic state. A research team from Kiel University has now managed to successfully place a new class of spin-crossover molecules onto a surface and to improve the molecule’s storage capacity. The storage density of conventional hard drives could therefore theoretically be increased by more than one hundred fold. The study has been published in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

Over the past few years, the building blocks of storage media have gotten ever smaller. But further miniaturization of the current technology is hindered by...

Im Focus: Successful Mechanical Testing of Nanowires

With innovative experiments, researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrums Geesthacht and the Technical University Hamburg unravel why tiny metallic structures are extremely strong

Light-weight and simultaneously strong – porous metallic nanomaterials promise interesting applications as, for instance, for future aeroplanes with enhanced...

Im Focus: Virtual Reality for Bacteria

An interdisciplinary group of researchers interfaced individual bacteria with a computer to build a hybrid bio-digital circuit - Study published in Nature Communications

Scientists at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) have managed to control the behavior of individual bacteria by connecting them to a...

Im Focus: A space-time sensor for light-matter interactions

Physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (run jointly by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute for Quantum Optics) have developed an attosecond electron microscope that allows them to visualize the dispersion of light in time and space, and observe the motions of electrons in atoms.

The most basic of all physical interactions in nature is that between light and matter. This interaction takes place in attosecond times (i.e. billionths of a...

Im Focus: A transistor of graphene nanoribbons

Transistors based on carbon nanostructures: what sounds like a futuristic dream could be reality in just a few years' time. An international research team working with Empa has now succeeded in producing nanotransistors from graphene ribbons that are only a few atoms wide, as reported in the current issue of the trade journal "Nature Communications."

Graphene ribbons that are only a few atoms wide, so-called graphene nanoribbons, have special electrical properties that make them promising candidates for the...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

AKL’18: The opportunities and challenges of digitalization in the laser industry

07.12.2017 | Event News

Blockchain is becoming more important in the energy market

05.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Making fuel out of thick air

08.12.2017 | Life Sciences

Rules for superconductivity mirrored in 'excitonic insulator'

08.12.2017 | Information Technology

Smartphone case offers blood glucose monitoring on the go

08.12.2017 | Information Technology

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>