Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Space Technology Centre opens at University of Dundee

18.03.2005


Lord Sainsbury, UK Minister for Science and Innovation will officially open the University of Dundee’s new Space Technology Centre that will carry out advanced research into planetary landing simulators and develop support technology for many space missions.



Opening on Friday 18 March the Space Technology Centre comprises the NERC Satellite Receiving Station at Dundee, The Space Systems Research Group and commercialisation activities including spin-out company STAR-Dundee.

Under the guidance of Dr Steve Parkes, the centre will develop new simulation tools and sensor models that realistically simulate landing a spacecraft on a planet or asteroid. In the most advanced technology of its kind in Europe, space agencies will be able to use the simulations to test planetary landers in different conditions to help ensure the real spacecraft will land successfully.


During the landing phase, spacecraft can encounter problems due to unknown conditions: craters or boulders at the planned landing site or even adverse lighting conditions or atmospheric effects. The simulation will guide a spacecraft through its landing phase on a planet or asteroid. By changing the variables such as terrain and atmospheric conditions the researchers can predict in what conditions the landing will be safe and make sure that the lander guidance system can cope with most unexpected situations. The European Space Agency (ESA) are already using the University’s simulations of Mars and Mercury to develop guidance and navigation systems for their own spacecraft.

The Space Systems Research Group at Dundee has had a major influence on the design of spacecraft onboard data-handling networks and led the technical work on the SpaceWire network standard, which is now being used on many ESA and NASA spacecraft. For example, ESA plan to use Space Wire technology in the 2009, Bepe Colombo flight to Mercury.

SpaceWire is a data-handling-network used onboard spacecrafts to gather, store and relay information to Earth. As the world leaders in SpaceWire research, the Dundee team are now working to develop a new, high-speed version, known as SpaceFibre.

From its beginnings, space research at the University has expanded and spin-out company STAR-Dundee is commercialising SpaceWire technology and now has partnerships with a range of blue-chip organisations across the world including ESA, NASA and Astrium, Europe’s largest manufacturer of spacecraft.

The NERC Satellite Receiving Station makes up the other half of the new Space Technology Centre. Supporting environmental scientists with earth observational data, the station supports key UK environmental projects.

Prof Steve Parkes said, “Development in space technology research in the University has moved rapidly since we first started out in 1997. Now for the first time, with the Space Technology Centre we can bring together our research, teaching and commercialisation to further advance our work. Our well focused research team will have a major effect on space craft electronic systems design across the world …and beyond.”

Angela Durcan | alfa
Further information:
http://www.dundee.ac.uk/pressreleases/prmar05/space.html

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht Writing and deleting magnets with lasers
19.04.2018 | Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf

nachricht Ultrafast electron oscillation and dephasing monitored by attosecond light source
19.04.2018 | Yokohama National University

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Writing and deleting magnets with lasers

Study published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces is the outcome of an international effort that included teams from Dresden and Berlin in Germany, and the US.

Scientists at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) together with colleagues from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) and the University of Virginia...

Im Focus: Gamma-ray flashes from plasma filaments

Novel highly efficient and brilliant gamma-ray source: Based on model calculations, physicists of the Max PIanck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg propose a novel method for an efficient high-brilliance gamma-ray source. A giant collimated gamma-ray pulse is generated from the interaction of a dense ultra-relativistic electron beam with a thin solid conductor. Energetic gamma-rays are copiously produced as the electron beam splits into filaments while propagating across the conductor. The resulting gamma-ray energy and flux enable novel experiments in nuclear and fundamental physics.

The typical wavelength of light interacting with an object of the microcosm scales with the size of this object. For atoms, this ranges from visible light to...

Im Focus: Basel researchers succeed in cultivating cartilage from stem cells

Stable joint cartilage can be produced from adult stem cells originating from bone marrow. This is made possible by inducing specific molecular processes occurring during embryonic cartilage formation, as researchers from the University and University Hospital of Basel report in the scientific journal PNAS.

Certain mesenchymal stem/stromal cells from the bone marrow of adults are considered extremely promising for skeletal tissue regeneration. These adult stem...

Im Focus: Like a wedge in a hinge

Researchers lay groundwork to tailor drugs for new targets in cancer therapy

In the fight against cancer, scientists are developing new drugs to hit tumor cells at so far unused weak points. Such a “sore spot” is the protein complex...

Im Focus: The Future of Ultrafast Solid-State Physics

In an article that appears in the journal “Review of Modern Physics”, researchers at the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (LAP) assess the current state of the field of ultrafast physics and consider its implications for future technologies.

Physicists can now control light in both time and space with hitherto unimagined precision. This is particularly true for the ability to generate ultrashort...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Invitation to the upcoming "Current Topics in Bioinformatics: Big Data in Genomics and Medicine"

13.04.2018 | Event News

Unique scope of UV LED technologies and applications presented in Berlin: ICULTA-2018

12.04.2018 | Event News

IWOLIA: A conference bringing together German Industrie 4.0 and French Industrie du Futur

09.04.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Diamond-like carbon is formed differently to what was believed -- machine learning enables development of new model

19.04.2018 | Materials Sciences

Electromagnetic wizardry: Wireless power transfer enhanced by backward signal

19.04.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Ultrafast electron oscillation and dephasing monitored by attosecond light source

19.04.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>