Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

ORNL’s Spallation Neutron Source warms up for 2006

27.09.2004


The warm section will provide 20 percent of the total acceleration of the Spallation Neutron Source’s linear accelerator.


With the recent "warm commissioning" of its linear accelerator, Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) has passed a crucial test and milestone on its way to completion in 2006.

The SNS’s linear accelerator, or linac, is composed of two sections: the "warm," or room temperature section, and a superconducting section that operates at temperatures hundreds of degrees below zero. Los Alamos National Laboratory, part of the team of six DOE national laboratories collaborating on the SNS construction project, is responsible for the warm linac. "The successful commissioning of the warm linac is another step toward the 2006 completion of the SNS, and again demonstrates the success of the collaboration of national labs in keeping the project on time, on budget and on scope," said SNS Director Thom Mason.

The warm section will provide 20 percent of the total acceleration of the 1,000-foot-long linac. The linac’s superconducting section, provided by the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, will provide 80 percent of linac acceleration. Testing also has begun of components of the superconducting portion, which consists of niobium cavities chilled by liquid helium to minus 456 degrees Fahrenheit.



Members of the Los Alamos SNS Division celebrated a job well done when components of the warm linac were shipped from the New Mexico laboratory to the project site in East Tennessee in April. "Professionally, this was the job of a lifetime: being able to contribute to DOE Office of Science’s biggest project," said Los Alamos SNS Division Leader Don Rej. "The excitement of working on big projects like this one comes from solving a seemingly endless string of insoluble problems, and solving them within budget and schedule constraints."

Because of their lack of charge, neutrons have a superior ability to penetrate materials. Researchers can determine a material’s molecular structure by analyzing the way the neutrons bounce, or scatter, after striking atoms within the structure. Using computational methods and state of the art instruments, researchers will better understand the molecular reasons behind the materials’ properties, which even with existing resources has resulted in the development of superior materials.

The SNS will produce neutrons for materials, biological and other scientific research by sending a high-energy beam of protons down a 1,000-foot linear accelerator to ultimately strike a mercury target, which will "spall" neutrons that are directed to the host of analytical instruments. "The warm linac commissioning is significant because it verifies the performance of the entire warm linac and ensures successful operation of the entire facility," said SNS Accelerator Systems Division Director Norbert Holtkamp. "Testing of the cold linac components is time critical to allow for the transition of the tests from Jefferson Lab to ORNL, which is a major step toward the transition from construction to operation."

The SNS will increase the number of neutrons available to researchers nearly tenfold, providing clearer images of molecular structures. Combined with ORNL’s High Flux Isotope Reactor, the SNS will represent the world’s foremost facility for neutron scattering analysis, a technique pioneered at ORNL shortly after World War II.

In addition to Los Alamos and Jefferson Lab, four other national laboratories collaborate on the DOE Office of Science project: Oak Ridge, Argonne, Lawrence Berkeley and Brookhaven. Berkeley Lab has completed the "front end," where the proton beam is initially generated. Brookhaven has responsibility for the SNS’s accumulator ring, a stage between the linac and target. Argonne leads the design of the facility’s scientific instruments. ORNL is responsible for the target and will be responsible for operating the SNS.

When completed in 2006, SNS will become the world’s leading research facility for study of the structure and dynamics of materials using neutrons. It will operate as a user facility that will enable researchers from the United States and abroad to study the science of materials that forms the basis for new technologies in energy, telecommunications, manufacturing, transportation, information technology, biotechnology and health.

Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a multiprogram laboratory managed for the Department of Energy by UT-Battelle.

Bill Cabage | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.ornl.gov

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht New material for splitting water
19.06.2018 | American Institute of Physics

nachricht Carbon nanotube optics provide optical-based quantum cryptography and quantum computing
19.06.2018 | DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Overdosing on Calcium

Nano crystals impact stem cell fate during bone formation

Scientists from the University of Freiburg and the University of Basel identified a master regulator for bone regeneration. Prasad Shastri, Professor of...

Im Focus: AchemAsia 2019 will take place in Shanghai

Moving into its fourth decade, AchemAsia is setting out for new horizons: The International Expo and Innovation Forum for Sustainable Chemical Production will take place from 21-23 May 2019 in Shanghai, China. With an updated event profile, the eleventh edition focusses on topics that are especially relevant for the Chinese process industry, putting a strong emphasis on sustainability and innovation.

Founded in 1989 as a spin-off of ACHEMA to cater to the needs of China’s then developing industry, AchemAsia has since grown into a platform where the latest...

Im Focus: First real-time test of Li-Fi utilization for the industrial Internet of Things

The BMBF-funded OWICELLS project was successfully completed with a final presentation at the BMW plant in Munich. The presentation demonstrated a Li-Fi communication with a mobile robot, while the robot carried out usual production processes (welding, moving and testing parts) in a 5x5m² production cell. The robust, optical wireless transmission is based on spatial diversity; in other words, data is sent and received simultaneously by several LEDs and several photodiodes. The system can transmit data at more than 100 Mbit/s and five milliseconds latency.

Modern production technologies in the automobile industry must become more flexible in order to fulfil individual customer requirements.

Im Focus: Sharp images with flexible fibers

An international team of scientists has discovered a new way to transfer image information through multimodal fibers with almost no distortion - even if the fiber is bent. The results of the study, to which scientist from the Leibniz-Institute of Photonic Technology Jena (Leibniz IPHT) contributed, were published on 6thJune in the highly-cited journal Physical Review Letters.

Endoscopes allow doctors to see into a patient’s body like through a keyhole. Typically, the images are transmitted via a bundle of several hundreds of optical...

Im Focus: Photoexcited graphene puzzle solved

A boost for graphene-based light detectors

Light detection and control lies at the heart of many modern device applications, such as smartphone cameras. Using graphene as a light-sensitive material for...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Munich conference on asteroid detection, tracking and defense

13.06.2018 | Event News

2nd International Baltic Earth Conference in Denmark: “The Baltic Sea region in Transition”

08.06.2018 | Event News

ISEKI_Food 2018: Conference with Holistic View of Food Production

05.06.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Carbon nanotube optics provide optical-based quantum cryptography and quantum computing

19.06.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

How to track and trace a protein: Nanosensors monitor intracellular deliveries

19.06.2018 | Life Sciences

New material for splitting water

19.06.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>