Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Largest Scale Model Of The Solar System To Be Built In The UK

07.07.2004


The world’s largest scale model of the Solar System will be created in the UK thanks to an award of £28,000 from NESTA (the National Endowment for Science, Technology & the Arts), the organisation that invests in UK creativity and innovation. The project, run by Spaced Out UK, will be made with 18 UK schools and visitor attractions and bring together artists, scientist and designers in raising the profile of astronomy and creating an exciting new learning resource for the nation.

In all, there will be 18 models dotted from Cornwall to the Shetland Islands, representing the Sun, the nine planets, Halley’s Comet and numerous asteroids. The Sun will be at the world-famous Jodrell Bank Observatory in Cheshire, Planet Earth in Macclesfield and Halley’s Comet in east London. Uranus will be in Bath, the city where William Herschel lived when he discovered the planet in 1781.

Science teacher Dr Nigel Marshall dreamed up the idea after hearing about Illinois’ current largest model of the Solar System. Now he is set to recruit teams of pupils from around the country to work with artists, designers and astronomers to create sculptures or artistic representations of the planets and asteroids.



Most models will be built in school grounds, with six at key visitor attractions. The scale of 1 to 15 million reduces the distance between the Earth and the Sun to about 10km (6 miles). However, Pluto will still be as far away as Aberdeen; Jupiter in Wrexham, Saturn will be in Lancaster and Halley’s Comet at Forest Gate Community School, east London.

NESTA’s support is being used to establish and develop partnerships between the host schools and visitor attractions, installation artists, designers and the Spaced Out team. The funding will also be used to publicise the project through a range of printed and electronic media and through attendance at conferences and exhibitions.

Dr Marshall said: "Thanks to support from NESTA, Spaced Out will become a national teaching resource accessible to all students in all schools. Even if the models only stay in place for three years and are seen only by pupils in the first three years of senior school, they will have cost just three pence per pupil. A small price to pay to help young people to understand something as complex as the Universe.”

Sarah Macnee, Acting NESTA Learning Director, said: “NESTA is committed to supporting experimental approaches to engaging the public in science, technology and the arts and we are delighted to be supporting this project which merges so many disciplines to deliver such an intriguing and unusual visitor experience.”

The full list of participating schools and visitor attractions are:

The Sun - Jodrell Bank Visitor’s Centre, Cheshire
Mercury - Hermitage Primary School, Holmes Chapel, Cheshire
Venus - Alderley Edge Primary School, Cheshire
Earth & Moon - Tytherington High School, Macclesfield, Cheshire
Mars - Hartford High School, Northwich, Cheshire
Ceres - Furness Vale Primary School, Furness Vale, Derbyshire
Gaspra - William Hulme’s Grammar School, South Manchester
Jupiter - Techniquest@NEWI, Wrexham, N. Wales
Saturn - Lancaster Girls’ Grammar School, Lancaster
Chiron - National Space Centre, Leicester
Pholus - Swanshurst School, S. Birmingham
Absolus - Spaceguard Centre, Knighton, Powys
Uranus - William Herschel Museum, Bath
Neptune - Armagh Planetarium, Armagh, N. Ireland
Pluto - Robert Gordon’s College, Aberdeen, Scotland
Halley’s Comet - Forest Gate School, Forest Gate, East London
Varuna - Camborne Community School, Camborne, Cornwall
TL66 - Whalsay School, Whalsay, Shetland Isles

Joseph Meaney | alfa
Further information:
http://www.nesta.org.uk

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht Scientists propose synestia, a new type of planetary object
23.05.2017 | University of California - Davis

nachricht Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence
23.05.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

Im Focus: Using graphene to create quantum bits

In the race to produce a quantum computer, a number of projects are seeking a way to create quantum bits -- or qubits -- that are stable, meaning they are not much affected by changes in their environment. This normally needs highly nonlinear non-dissipative elements capable of functioning at very low temperatures.

In pursuit of this goal, researchers at EPFL's Laboratory of Photonics and Quantum Measurements LPQM (STI/SB), have investigated a nonlinear graphene-based...

Im Focus: Bacteria harness the lotus effect to protect themselves

Biofilms: Researchers find the causes of water-repelling properties

Dental plaque and the viscous brown slime in drainpipes are two familiar examples of bacterial biofilms. Removing such bacterial depositions from surfaces is...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

Innovation 4.0: Shaping a humane fourth industrial revolution

17.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Scientists propose synestia, a new type of planetary object

23.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Zap! Graphene is bad news for bacteria

23.05.2017 | Life Sciences

Medical gamma-ray camera is now palm-sized

23.05.2017 | Medical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>